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  1. #11
    Loose Gravel's Avatar
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    Don't forget that film and paper have reciprocity failure and thresholds, so a little bit of light is not seen by these materials. Unless you are getting a direct reflection, you are okay. If you need it darker, close you eyes.
    Watch for Loose Gravel

  2. #12
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    Unless you are doing lots and lots of film in trays and light is hitting directly...you'll be fine. Paper ISO is sooooooo slow anyway. Most B&W commercial darkrooms I've been to don't even have a door, just something 'nuf to keep direct light from coming into it.

  3. #13
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    Is this darkroom you built a seperate building? If it is and you see daylight at the bottom, just remember when the wind is blowing, dust or snow at your elevation will be coming in that crack. I would do like Sean did.
    Non Digital Diva

  4. #14

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    Daft as it sounds the more natural light I can keep out of a darkroom, the easier I can see using the safelight. I find when there are even small leaks the room doesn't seem as evenly illuminated by the safelight.

  5. #15
    Dave Wooten's Avatar
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    how dark does a darkroom have to be

    Put a sheet of photo paper face up in your darkroom and place some coins on the paper. After five or so minutes develope the paper.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by TPPhotog
    Daft as it sounds the more natural light I can keep out of a darkroom, the easier I can see using the safelight. I find when there are even small leaks the room doesn't seem as evenly illuminated by the safelight.
    I agree with you, Tony! I want it DARK in my darkroom...otherwise wouldn't it be a sorta-darkroom??? Or a mostly-darkroom???

    Those cloth tube thing-ys used to keep drafts out are perfect for the bottom of a door. Or like Michael says...use a towel. Heck, if you've got light blocked everywhere else, the bottom of the door is a snap to fix!
    Jeanette
    .................................................. ................
    Isaiah 25:1

  7. #17
    glbeas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Wooten
    Put a sheet of photo paper face up in your darkroom and place some coins on the paper. After five or so minutes develope the paper.
    This should be amended by exposing the paper first so it will develop to a light grey and then set it out with the coins on it. This will bump the paper over its threshold level and give a realistic test of the actual printing conditions. Any fogging will show a darker grey outline of the coins.
    Gary Beasley

  8. #18
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    A different view of this question. Dust is also coming in that crack under the door. Seal it for the light. Seal it for the dust. Hey, two for the price of one.

    John

  9. #19
    Charles Webb's Avatar
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    Before making a decision that light leaking into a darkroom is not affecting or fogging your material, run a simple test. In fact the same test used for checking your "safe light" works for checking how much leaking light is in
    the area where you handle your sensitized paper/film. An exposed or slightly exposed sheet of paper or film seems to be more sensitive and liable to fog than a sheet with no exposure. The quality of the finished product will be diminished/degraded if there is any stray light bouncing around in your chosen workspace. I still use a green safe light for inspection developing,
    but only at the tail end of the developing process when the films sensitivity
    to light is all but exhausted. Each to his own, but I will guarantee that if you can see anything at all in a darkroom after ten minutes with the lights off,
    that your materials will be fogging and your quality will not be what it could be!.

    Respectfully,
    C Webb

  10. #20
    Dave Wooten's Avatar
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    Gary is correct


    Dave Wooten

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