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  1. #21
    Ole
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Webb
    Each to his own, but I will guarantee that if you can see anything at all in a darkroom after ten minutes with the lights off,
    that your materials will be fogging and your quality will not be what it could be!
    That is not my experience. Film in the developer is a lot less sensitive to light, which helps quite a bit. I have compared identically exposed sheets, one developed in trays in the darkish-room, one in a JOBO tank. There is no discernible difference in the negatives, and I can no longer find out which is which.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  2. #22

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    The problem or otherwise also depends on how you work and thus how long the paper or film are exposed to whatever small amount of light there is. Also, during printing most enlarger heads leak light to some extent anyway, "polluting" your darkness. I have a couple of small chinks of light that I can't quite get rid of (and don't cause me enough bother to be worth trying too hard!) but although I don't find any problem with printing, I do make a point of loading and unloading film from cassettes when it's dark outside anyway - so problem solved!
    Best wishes,
    Steve

  3. #23

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    These different experiences here are great. I was always worried about not being able to having my room totally dark. During daytime, the sunlight (if there is any in this sad part of the world) strikes my darkroom window full force, and I get light leaks all over the place. I have just kept on printing so far. Really, I should have done that test with the coin, but my prints turned out just fine, i.e. of the same quality that I get at night.

    But, I haven't loaded any film onto spirals until it's dark outside and I'm sure it's pitch black in the darkroom. I don't want to take risks at that stage.

  4. #24

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    I've got the odd leak during the morning to. The thing is that light doesn't hit the paper. Follow the advice to do a safelight test for the room.

  5. #25
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    My darkroom would make a purist shudder. After ten minutes of dark adaption, I can see ALL kinds of light leaks.
    I've tried the "Exposure Meter Test". My Gossen Ultra-Pro is a sensitive meter ... reading to a maximum of 8 hours exposure at f/0.7 with a film speed of 800,000 (DIN 60). When turned up to the most sensitive settings, and taking a reading in this leaky environment, I get a "flashing" display... out of range. If the conditions are such that I'd need more than eight hours exposure at an ISO of 800,000 and an aperture of f/0.7 to get an overall 18% gray exposure --- I'm not going to worry about fogging.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  6. #26
    RAP
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    I just finished painting the outside of my house and had to recover the darkroom windows. I took two heavy duty, industrial size black garbage bags, one closed in on the upper storm window jam, the other on the bottom, from the inside, between the sash and the storms. Then one held in by the upper sash jam and the lower sash, on the outside of the sash. Then I took some cardboard packaging from a refrigerator and cut it to size and stapled on each window.

    Then I went to a fabric store and bought a a large piece of the heaviest, blackest material I could find and made a large, drap for over the doorway. Large enough for pleets to form when closed and to lay on the floor. Make sure the curtain rod is placed to one side far enough so you can push the curtain over far enough to open the door. Use molly bolts in the sheet rock if you cannot find the studs to hold the curtain rod.

    The morning sun blasts my darkroom windows and I cannot see my hand inches infront of my face. Even after the scotch. Not in the morning though.

    The fog tests should be used to test your safelight. Your darkroom should be pitch black.
    Time & tides wait for no one, especially photographers.

  7. #27
    Helen B's Avatar
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    Ed wrote:"My Gossen Ultra-Pro is a sensitive meter ... reading to a maximum of 8 hours exposure at f/0.7 with a film speed of 800,000 (DIN 60)."

    err... that's 16.8 million times (24 stops) more sensitive than the Lunasix, isn't it?

    Best,
    Helen

  8. #28
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    I process my films in the kitchen using a changing bag and Jobo drum because my darkroom is more of a dimroom. Doesn't seem to have any effect on paper though.
    [size=1]the all new darkplanet photoblog[/size][size=1]
    [/size]

  9. #29
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    Here's a tip that I came up with when I got tired of waiting until 10:00 PM to print during the Summertime.

    I block my windows with Black foamcore mount boards. They are lightweight, opaque, easy to cut to size with a razor blade and quick to put up for a printing session and removed afterwards. I glued some felt weatherstripping around the edges to block any light coming around the sides. It works Great!
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  10. #30
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Helen B
    Ed wrote:"My Gossen Ultra-Pro is a sensitive meter ... reading to a maximum of 8 hours exposure at f/0.7 with a film speed of 800,000 (DIN 60)."
    err... that's 16.8 million times (24 stops) more sensitive than the Lunasix, isn't t?
    Helen
    I Don't know. What is the range of the Lunasix? I don't have any information about it.

    On consideration... what I've written may be misleading - to "cut finely", The "Measuring Range" (Ambient) as stated in the Gossen manual is : EV -4 to EV 18 at 21 DIN/100 ISO.

    EV -4 does not indicate much light... and, being out of range, I have less light than that.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

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