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  1. #11
    ROL
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arctic amateur View Post
    Is HC needed with rapid fix?
    No, you do not need hypoclear with film.

    As previously stated, HC reduces wash times. Washing film for 20 to 30 minutes without it should be fine. Acetate film bases (i.e., non-emulsion, plastic-y part of the film) absorb little if any chemical. All you are doing is washing the emulsion. However, this is not quite the case with print washing, since paper, particularly fiber-based, can deteriorate with times sufficient to wash the hypo (fix) out of the emulsion and paper. HC is quite helpful in this regard.

    FWIW, I treat roll film somewhat differently from sheet film. Roll film is hung in a "protected environment" after having been rinsed in photo-flo. I never squeegee roll film – the emulsion is soft at this point, and you're playing with fire. Sheet film only undergoes a final distilled water rinse (no photo-flo) and then hung to dry in the open in my lab. Both dry spot and streak free. Both share processing by mixing developers and final rinsing only in distilled water, even though I have filtered water available in my lab. You only get one chance with negatives, and distilled water seems a relatively small price to pay for some peace of mind, when processing film. You can try filtering water, but I think it will be a shot in the dark as to which reactive elements you are actually filtering that are important to your developing. I don't know why you cannot find distilled water in your neck of the woods, but it is pretty generally available, and you could always distill your own, if necessary.

  2. #12
    Bruce Robbins's Avatar
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    Instead of washing for half an hour - I'm too impatient for that - I use the Ilford wash method: Fill tank with water and ten inversions, drain really well, fill again and twenty inversions, drain again and refill for forty inversions. This method uses less water if that's important to you but it's been proved to wash film to archival standards. Not applicable if you're tray developing sheet film. ;-)
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  3. #13

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    I use bottled water for mixing chemicals. I don't have a water filter jug, but I may get one if it's more cost efficient. I don't have easy access to distilled water.

  4. #14

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    Things seem to be going well so far, the films come out of the tank with decent-looking negatives on them.

    I have a roll of Shanghai GP3 100 that I shot at 400, to try out push processing and see how it looks. How much should I extend development time? I have difficulty finding a rule for push processing that actually gives a number (maybe my google-fu is weak). My developer is Kodak TMAX.

    ETA: I checked a bit more and tried thinking (always a difficult task). The Massive Dev Chart suggests 7 minutes for GP3 100 shot at box speed, and the developer's booklet says 8 minutes for TMax 100 at EI 100, 12 minutes for EI 400. So 11-12 minutes for GP3@400, and add a minute or two for dev exhaustion.
    Last edited by Arctic amateur; 09-16-2012 at 07:22 PM. Click to view previous post history.

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