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  1. #11

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    He didn't say where he is to have the darkroom so ventilation/exhaust system comes to mind also a print washer or tray siphon, print drying screens and tongs and/or nitrile gloves. Chemistry: print and film developer, stop, fixer, hypo clearing agent, photoflo and if inclined toner of choice. And of great importance an understanding significant other or spouse.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/

  2. #12

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    There are pros and cons for re-using other bottles intended for other purposes. This is one of the hottest debated topic. Myself, I use chemical storage bottles from photo retailers.

    None of the B&W photo chemicals are down right toxic. Perhaps most are far less toxic than house hold cleaners. That said, they are not made for drinking and it will make you feel sick or make you sick. I take two step method for many things in darkroom to prevent mistakes.

    For example, my paper safe has a tape across the opening in addition to a latch. What the tape is supposed to do is, if I become careless and try to open it, it will stop me just long enough for me to realize, I am making a mistake. Visual warning is a step 1. Tactile warning is a step 2.

    Same thing for bottles. I never bring drinks or food into my darkroom. I also use specific bottles for photo chemicals. They are all labeled clearly. Visual should stop me first. If that fails, unfamiliar (for drinks) touch should help me second.

    The choice is yours. I prefer to not have accidents. By nature, accidents happen when your concentration and attention aren't at optimum. By definition, anything can happen - even if you are normally a careful person.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  3. #13
    artonpaper's Avatar
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    I would add a paper safe to your list. It will make printing go a bit smoother. Definitely an anti-static cloth. Don't use bottles that contained household chemicals such as bleach or ammonia.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgwetworth View Post
    Are there any home bottles I can use? IE: Bleach bottle washed out or another chemical or drink.
    White vinegar comes in very thick plastic bottles that are terrific. If you are near a Costco, they sell milk in heavy square plastic bottles with a huge mouth. These are the best!

    Easy rule of thumb is developers need full glass bottles (ideally), fixers and stop baths are fine in half full plastic or glass.
    Parker Smith Photography, Inc.
    Atlanta, GA

    Commercial & Fine Art Photography
    Portrait Photography

  5. #15
    ParkerSmithPhoto's Avatar
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    A good fan blowing over your shoulder is nice to keep the smells down. Use Rapid Fix and odorless stop (or mix very dilute stop bath) for maximum smell-free action.

    Also, get some PecPads to wipe your negs before printing. There is nothing better for dust busting. Those things grab dust so well that I can print with a glass carrier in my dusty basement and almost never have any problems with dust.
    Parker Smith Photography, Inc.
    Atlanta, GA

    Commercial & Fine Art Photography
    Portrait Photography

  6. #16
    jgwetworth's Avatar
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    Thanks a lot everyone this is helping loads. I got an venting system for my room already, and I Just went out to pick up an easel. I think ill be using Dektol for prints and D-76for negs but what else should I grab in the way of chemicals? I know i need a stop and fixer but what's a good one to go with? Also Ill be using glass mason jars to store my chemicals.

  7. #17
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    Add some Orbit or HCA (Hypo Clearing Agent) to reduce the wash time for all the work, prints or negatives. Photo Flo (that spelled right?).. it does help reduce water spots of film and I think it can be used for prints also. Possibly some white cotton gloves when handling your negatives, though I don't find them convenient.
    I would also second the suggestion to get storage containers SPECIFICALLY FOR Photography. If you have small children or might ever have some visiting, or what ever, you would not want someone picking up the wrong bottle.
    Cameras.
    Nikon F2a (semi-retired), Nikon 28mm, Sigma 500mm f8, Vivitar Series I 70-210 zoom
    2 Nikon N90s one 70 - 300 AF Macro, one 100 - 300 AF)
    Nikon N90 w/ 100 - 300 AF lens, 24-50 AF, 35-70 AF
    Mamiya C220 80mm f2.8, 180mm f4.5, 135mm f4.5, 65mm f6.5

    Three Sony Mavica Digital cameras, and a Fuji FinePix S2800HD I got after the partner died.. HP Photosmart E327
    and some Bushnell Binoculars with digit camera built in.
    Omega Super Chromega C-700 6X7 enlarger with 50mm and 80mm lens

  8. #18
    artonpaper's Avatar
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    Chemistry that comes in liquid form is easier to deal with. Just dilute and you're ready to go. I've used Edwald and Ethol liquid print developers and they were both fine. We use Sprint chemistry where I teach and it also very good. Keep it as simple as possible in the beginning.

  9. #19
    aleksmiesak's Avatar
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    I'm guessing you'll be printing some contact sheets of your negs as well so a good piece of glass with rounded (or taped) edges will come in handy to keep your negs flat. Formulary has a great neutral fixer called TF-5 that when mixed with distilled water has almost zero odor. I know some here are quite fond of the fix smell and might disown me for even saying this but odor free darkroom is quite pleasant
    Aleksandra Miesak

    "One should really use the camera as though tomorrow you'd be stricken blind." - Dorothea Lange

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by jgwetworth View Post
    I think ill be using Dektol for prints and D-76for negs but what else should I grab in the way of chemicals? I know i need a stop and fixer but what's a good one to go with? Also Ill be using glass mason jars to store my chemicals.
    You might as well start out with Arista or LegacyPro. Both will certainly get you going at a good price, and both appear to have several Kodak clones in their lineup, according to Freestyle's catalog.

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