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  1. #21

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    Dec 2007
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    Actually it doesn't matter much which brand stop and fix you will use: they are all ok as long you use them as intended. They don't influence the print quality. Stop can be replaced by diluted table vinegar (a dilution of about 1+ 4 should be about right) and some people even prefer a water rinse. Any general fix will do aswell. Keep track of the capacity and seperate the working solutions for prints and films and you're settled. I would get something odorless that is readely available and not to expsensive.

  2. #22
    nicholai's Avatar
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    I would advice you to get drying clips/hangers and a film squeegee.
    Nicholai Nissen
    Kolding, Denmark
    nicholainissen@gmail.com

  3. #23
    Leigh B's Avatar
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    Some general suggestions:

    Stop bath...
    Use Kodak Indicator Stop Bath if available. The indicator function is useful when doing large print runs. You won't exhaust it with film.
    Avoid use of water as a stop except for films that specifically require it. Water is not a stop, and does not stop development activity.

    HCA and Photo-Flo...
    I use Perma-Wash for hypo clearing of film and paper, but other products are similar. This GREATLY reduces wash time. Use as directed.
    Photo-Flo is mandatory IMO if you want to avoid water spots on film. It's not used with paper. Dilute as directed and discard.

    Keep all chemicals in the dark. Use of brown bottles for developer is highly desirable, but not mandatory.

    Two safety issues...
    1) Never use any bottles with visible consumer product markings (even effaced) for storage in the darkroom (soda, vinegar, whatever).
    2) Never permit any consumer beverages in the darkroom (soda, beer, etc) in their original containers.
    These two steps combined will minimize the likelihood of ingesting photo chemicals.

    Enjoy.

    - Leigh
    “Wise men talk because they have something to say; fools, because they have to say something.” - Plato

  4. #24
    vintagesnaps's Avatar
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    I'd been using a shared darkroom at a local university that has studios available for use by members of the community - until the college decided to remodel the building; so I've been accumulating what I'd need to set up my own darkroom at home.

    I think it's better to keep chemistry in containers intended for that purpose and marked accordingly. You'd also need measuring beakers/graduates, gloves; and maybe these have been mentioned - safelight, timer.

    Sharing a darkroom that got a lot of usage, it got pretty dusty (and I guess it didn't help being over the pottery studio!) so I took along a microfiber cloth for the enlarger, and they used Beseler dustguns to clean the negatives (I used one as needed).

    I found it helped to use tongs of different colors or with tips in different colors (I prefer bamboo to plastic) for the developer, stop, fixer - that helped prevent cross contamination so as you slide paper into one tray the tongs can be put back with the previous tray. (I had experiences with getting black marks on prints and just got into the habit of rinsing them all well first... but I think it will help me at home to keep tongs for each type of chemistry).

    While I'm in the process of setting up a darkroom I've been doing lumen prints, and using ferrotype plates as my surface to squeegee prints. They're intended to make prints glossy if you leave the prints on them to dry, but I just find they're a nice surface and fit across my kitchen sink; they're easy to squeegee and wipe dry, and store.

    To dry prints I've used a photo drying book, and am experimenting with a silk screen tray (which is more portable and easier to store than a large drying rack). One small size screen can't hold many prints at a time, but for my purposes now using expired/small sized photo paper it seems to work.

    And maybe you'd need 'cheat sheets', they had some up in the shared darkroom and I found that to be a help to refer to for the steps and times, especially starting out.
    Sharon

  5. #25

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    May 2012
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    I just got some chemical containers from B+H...they're only a few dollar each.

  6. #26
    Reinhold's Avatar
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    Has anyone mentioned dodging wands?

    Most folks end up inventing a motly collection of wands improvised from bent coat hanger wire and bits of cardboard and tape. Almost anything will work. As you get more practiced, you may decide to get a nice set made just for the active printer : http://www.apug.org/forums/forum379/...om-batons.html

    Reinhold

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