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  1. #1

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    Mix your own... solutions for everything ??

    Over the past few years I have noticed quite a few "home brew" developer solutions coming onto the net. This is a wonderful expansion of our interests and has permitted many of us to branch out and enjoy photography to a much greater degree.

    My question is ... Is there other "home brew" solutions that can be explored?

    I am thinking of things such as "ferrotype solutions, print flattening mixtures, and equivalent to fixers like TF-4". I do realize that Steve Anchell has a couple of books out on this topic but am hoping to hear from APUGer's who have done their own experimentation and share their findings.

    So ... can you offer up any home brews to keep us all busy during the Christmas holiday season?

    Kind Regards,

    GreyWolf
    Never be afraid to try something new. Remember, amateurs built the ark. Professionals built the Titanic.

  2. #2
    Ole
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    Anything can be mixed at home, with the possible exception of selenium and polysulfide toners. And those I would avoid just because the constituents are particularly nasty!

    My OF-1 fixer is an alkaline "rapidised" fixer - easy to mix, cheap ingredients, less smelly than TF-4, and only marginally slower.

    Anything else you'd like to see?
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  3. #3
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    I've certainly learned a lot by getting over the barrier of purchasing a scale and mixing my own. I have Anchell's _Darkroom Cookbook_ and just recently bought v. 1 of Grant Haist's _Modern Photographic Processing_, which is the source of many formulas in less technical manuals and more, and I've also picked up others from various spots on the net like unblinkingeye.com, apug of course, the B&W forums on photo.net, and http://www.jackspcs.com/

    Formulas I use regularly are ABC pyro, PMK, and Michael Smith's amidol formulas for Azo and for enlarging papers.

    I've been experimenting with variations on XR-1, which is a developer for push processing and a few other applications like night photography. The next one I want to try is RAF pyro-metol high energy film developer.

    For me it doesn't really pay to mix my own fixer. I can buy TF-4 off the shelf at B&H for the same price as Formulary minus the shipping but plus the sales tax, and I've worked out that I wouldn't really save much by mixing TF-3.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  4. #4

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    You want my stout receipe?-)))

    You can even mix colour chemicals if you want.

  5. #5

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    Thanks folks.

    For us folks outside of the U.S.A. the shipping cost of TF-4 as a liquid is prohibitive. For this reason mixing a suitable replacement would be a nice option.

    I am also curious about ferrotypying FB prints ...print flattening solutions and the like. Do these things affect the final appearance of the prints?

    In days gone by...was it just too much work to do print finishing like this?

    Thanks
    Never be afraid to try something new. Remember, amateurs built the ark. Professionals built the Titanic.

  6. #6
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    In days gone by, I think they did this stuff in such quantity that it was second nature. They went through Pakosol by the gallon and ferrotyped in quantity. A ferrotyped print has a really high gloss.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
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  7. #7
    rjr
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    Greywolf,

    "For us folks outside of the U.S.A. the shipping cost of TF-4 as a liquid is prohibitive. For this reason mixing a suitable replacement would be a nice option."

    Any E6/C41-fixer will serve the purpose of rapid and neutral/alkaline odorless fixing as good or better than TF4 - at a much lower price.

    I pay 6EUR/2l for the Calbe FX-R, which is good for 10l of fixing solution (the 5l jugs are even cheaper in comparison) - Calbe is Fuji-Hunt chemistry... Tetenal calls it "Unicolor Fix", Agfa labels their competetive product "FX Universal" and even states that you can use it for BW film and paper on the label.

    Re ferrotyping -the extreme high gloss adds to the density and contrast, it doesn´t serve any image... sometimes it "glows". Why do people have so much trouble with ferrotyping their prints? The papers have changed. Thats it.
    Tschüss,
    Roman

  8. #8
    Helen B's Avatar
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    'I am also curious about ferrotypying FB prints ...print flattening solutions and the like. Do these things affect the final appearance of the prints?

    In days gone by...was it just too much work to do print finishing like this?'



    "In days gone by," in many labs, prints were glazed (UK English for 'ferrotyped') by dropping the wet prints onto a glazing machine ('ferrotype dryer' in US English?) which was a highly polished chrome-plated, heated, metal drum with an endless fabric belt tightly held against it. It was very easy to do, but there was always the danger that someone had contaminated the belt with fixer from a poorly washed print. If you wanted your print glazed you put it onto the drum face in, if unglazed you put it on face out. I dried almost all my prints this way, and despite having used a communal darkroom, none of my prints have shown signs of staining after thirty years.

    A lot of these machines were given away to anyone who had space for them when RC paper became popular.

    At home I used to cold-glaze prints on the glass doors of my bookcases. The glass had to be well cleaned and scratch-free otherwise the prints would stick firmly to the glass. After squeegeeing onto the glass, they had to be held against the glass as they dried to prevent blemishes in the print surface as the dry parts of the print curled off the glass.

    Best,
    Helen
    Last edited by Helen B; 12-23-2004 at 10:09 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #9
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena
    You want my stout receipe?-)))

    You can even mix colour chemicals if you want.
    I do !

    A few years ago I bought the entire remaining stock of specialist photographic chemicals from a laboratiory supply company. UK members might remember Hogg Laboratory Supplies being listed in the BJP annual, in the Formula section.

    Ian

  10. #10
    Ole
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    Ten minutes ago I picked an "AGFA Rezepte" 1951 book out of my mailbox. It contains recipes for just about every AGFA developer, stop, fix and toner ever published (except the then-new Agfacolor process).

    Plenty to play with there...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails agfabook.jpg  
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

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