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  1. #11

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    wow that sounds brilliant - i may give it a try if i can get my head round it. all i need now is for the paper to not be fogged!!

  2. #12

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    There's someone in Sheffield selling a set of trays for making large prints, collection only, item number 170916778626, only one bid of 99p so far. (no connection with seller)

  3. #13

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    Here in the US, Home Depot has PVC tubs for mixing concrete, 24x35 inches, for $12.65. i looked at them as a substitute for a sink and they look pretty indestructible. You ought to be able to fine something like that in the UK.

    http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1...roductDisplay?
    catalogId=10053&langId=-1&keyword=mixingtub&storeId=10051#.UGy0dpjA8hU
    A politician is a man who will double cross that bridge when he comes to it.

    Oscar Levant

  4. #14

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    im looking but alas the common diy stores dont seem to sell them. sad because they looked perfect!

  5. #15
    paul_c5x4's Avatar
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    You could also look at the Garland Titan gravel trays - 1000mm x 550mm x 150mm - These will be extremely heavy once full of chemicals, as would any large tray..

  6. #16
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    nice find paul... I have used the gardening trays for work before but they have huge dimples which hold extra water , these ones look very good. Yes hard to manage
    when full , you need to get the water out slowly.


    Quote Originally Posted by paul_c5x4 View Post
    You could also look at the Garland Titan gravel trays - 1000mm x 550mm x 150mm - These will be extremely heavy once full of chemicals, as would any large tray..

  7. #17

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    ill have a loko out for them in the uk. i have heard some people talk about really diluting down the developer -do you think thats necessary?

  8. #18
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
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    I had a bit of exposure to large print processing as a young teen apprenticed for a few weeks one or two nights to an older guy who made photo murals - generally 36" high by several feet long on mural weight (heavier than DW) fibre based paper. Just at the beginning of my interest in photogrpahy. Old british guy who had worked in photo reconnaisance in WWII, Fred Noakes. Long gone by now. I would love to know what became of his gear.

    He had an epoxy piant coated piece of plywood, with a lip on the lower edge (i will call it as Fred did, as the platten), that sat on a braced affair on a cart. The cart made it tall enough to allow the lip to drain into the sink, or a bucket placed in the sink. It could be taken apart when not needed.

    After exposure, you would untack it from the wall, and roll the paper up emusion side in. Start processing it with the leading edge of the mural at the downhill end of the platten. You would wet the platten with a wet sponge so the paper would stick to it, then, rubber gloves on, lightly rub the face of the emulsion with a sponge dipped in a bucket of Dektol, more dilute than normal. Once the first part was soaked and coming up, roll it up, unroll more and start on the next section.

    Then look over the results, and see if any areas were weak, and needed more developer rubbed on. If not, hose down with low pressure running water and a clean sponge to wash/stop the developer. Then fixer one rub down, then fixer two rub down, then three passes of washing. The later two often the next morning.
    my real name, imagine that.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by anikin View Post
    Then I start slowly rotating the PVC cylinder and unrolling the photo into it while entering the developer. When you unroll the whole paper, it sticks to the PVC cylinder by capillary effect (it sticks like glue).
    Anikin - i can kind of picture this. do you put the paper ONTO THE OUTSIDE of the cylinder as you rotate it into the developer?

  10. #20

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    I've used the troughs and float a PVC pipe with caps on either end, it floats in the chemistry and rolls. Place the print in the trough, emulsion down and place the pipe on top, it will hold the paper under the chemistry. Then with the help of a second person, on large sheet sizes, roll the paper back and forth until developed Then lift and transfer to a fixer trough, than a perma wash trough, then a water trough or clip the print to an over sized sheet of marine plywood or fiberglass sheeting, anything waterproof, rest it in a sink and hose off the paper. It works for me and you can make the troughs out of marine plywood and line them with heavy duty sheet plastic 4mil or better, or fiberglass them! They can accommodate what ever size paper that you choose, depending on the size of the trough.

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