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  1. #1
    macandal's Avatar
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    Software for negative management (archiving)

    So, I found this thread about negative management:

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum37/1...anagement.html

    They offer some good systems about cataloging one's photographs (YY-Roll/Sheet, etc). There's a lot of info there to think about how complicated or how easy one wants to keep one's negatives. If anyone wants to contribute more to that, you're welcome to do so.

    However, my question has to do with software. I've decided that rather than keeping contact sheets or looking at a negative through a lupe to select an image, I want to scan my negatives and keep a digital archive of each image. Each image will then have tags that describe what the image represents. All other additional info, such as the processing method used to develop the image, would also be included here. So the question is, what's a good software to buy to archive my negatives? I was thinking about getting Apple's Aperture. Has anyone used that? Would you recommend it? I'm taking suggestions solely for the purpose of archiving images. Even with my digital images, I'm not one to alter my images digitally that much, so that's why I haven't considered Photoshop or Lightroom, but I'm open to what works best. Thanks.

  2. #2

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    I use Aperture on the Mac for that. I tag them with the map and film nr. and image nr. on the film.
    works for me

  3. #3
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Adobe Lightroom has a lot of advantages when it comes to keeping track of images, so I wouldn't discount it totally. In particular, it includes built in tools that aid in systemizing organization of files and ensuring backups, and includes a work-flow that helps protect against inadvertent write-over of originals.

    Corel's Aftershot Pro has some similarities to Lightroom, and has the advantage of a license that permits using with each of Windows, Mac and Linux operating systems.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  4. #4

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    I'm a Mac user and have been using Apple's Aperture since it came out and like it. I have friends that like Adobe's LightRoom.

  5. #5

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    I use Lightroom for this very purpose. It works well.

  6. #6
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    I use Photo Mechanic version 4.5 which is very good for many tasks, but doesn't - this old version at least - offer a search through the entire collection of pictures. It is basically directory-based. It is very good for keywording though, and it lets you set keywords or other information (such as photographer, copyright etc.) in "batch mode". It is configurable with a list of aliases which shortens typing in certain situations.

    I use Adobe Lightroom 2.3 for searching into my entire image database. This is an old version (I think they are at version 4 by now) but it is fit for the purpose. I don't find Lightroom practical for keywording.

    Both programs can write file informations on XML "sidecar files" and/or append the information to the image itself. I find it better to use sidecar files. They also allow exchange of information between programs (I see in Lightroom keywords and description that I prepared with PhotoMechanic, and vice versa). Lightroom also keeps an internal database which is populated with all information into sidecar files and used for searches.

    Lightroom costs more but offers more as it is a program for basic photographic post-processing of scans. It also opens "linear DNG" files.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  7. #7
    Greg Davis's Avatar
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    Lightroom 4 is much better about keywording than it used to be. That is what I use to catalog all my images, film and digital.
    www.gregorytdavis.com

    Did millions of people suddenly disappear? This may have an answer.

    "No one knows that day or hour, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father." -Matthew 24:36

  8. #8
    ArtO's Avatar
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    I think that Photoshop Elements 10 (and 11 soon), does a very nice job of cataloging images. Terrific and easy to use search capabilities too.
    ------------------------------------------------------------
    Art

  9. #9
    chriscrawfordphoto's Avatar
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    I find Lightroom to be excruciatingly slow for this purpose, especially if you have thousands of large files in your archive like I do. Lightroom and aperture are really raw editing programs, and that's what they do best. I prefer a dedicated database, and I have been using Microsoft Expression Media (formerly iView Mediapro, now sold by Phase One under yet another name) for many years. It is fast even with the thousands of images in the database. It lets me put my images on any disk I want, even external drives, and it builds a database without altering or moving the image files, and it lets you find the original file with a click of the mouse.
    Chris Crawford
    Fine Art Photography of Indiana and other places no one else photographs.

    http://www.chriscrawfordphoto.com

    My Tested Developing Times with the films and developers I use

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    Fort Wayne, Indiana



 

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