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  1. #11
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Probably a bit obvious, but a taller and narrower the measuring cylinder allows greater accuracy.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  2. #12
    Matthew Cherry's Avatar
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    Yes, I think I'm going to first get a set of graduated cylinders. For those of you working with multiple chemistries, do you use the same set and, if so, how do you clean between chemistries?

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Cherry View Post
    Looking at some Polymethylpentene ones now. I greatly prefer black lines and numbers to white, though...
    This is a common problem but I'll share with you a trick my H.S. chemistry teacher taught us (40+ years ago). Take a small piece of black construction paper and hold it behind the cylinder at the the fluid level. View the fluid from underneath and you will see that the bottom of the meniscus, which is the actual level, goes dark against the light markings on the glass making the level readily visible. I've always liked glass for this reason, though I've never used the Poly... type so I'm sure the technique will work there too.

    Steve

  4. #14
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    If you have a good scales with enough capacity, make agood measurement and weigh it..A standard production technique. I mix all my working strength chems by weight..

  5. #15
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    Steve has some very good advice! Advice that I have had to give countless students when I taught chem courses myself.

    And depending on what volumes you most frequently require, you could always try getting a volumetric pipette or some graduated pipettes. They're essentially like bigger, more accurate eyedroppers. Less lifting and pouring.

  6. #16
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    I guess this is an ALT process thing ive taken with me, since using 1 or 2 ml of something is what i usually do; I use syringes for measuring everything, even water if its one-shot..
    Nicholai Nissen
    Kolding, Denmark
    nicholainissen@gmail.com

  7. #17
    Matthew Cherry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eclarke View Post
    If you have a good scales with enough capacity, make agood measurement and weigh it..A standard production technique. I mix all my working strength chems by weight..
    This is kind of brilliant, actually...

  8. #18
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    Let's talk about glassware!

    And if you have time and patience there's always someone posting a bunch of cheap glassware on eBay.

    If you really like the syringe idea I use a bunch of pipettes with rubber fill valves. Watch long enough and you can get them cheap.

    I did buy the pipettes separate from the fill bulbs. I think the bulbs were from a Far East supplier, but the pipettes were from a medical lab closure. I got about 20 for a couple of bucks.
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

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