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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by eric
    Bwahh! Nice pic. For some reason, I thought he was a septic tank cleaner
    I'm not really a left coaster.

    Check out the 'towers' on the left horizon.

    Oh, and one of my boats.

    BTW, water treatment plants, sewage plants, generating stations, toxic waste pipes, nuclear pools, etc. are all serviced by commercial divers. Darkroom chemicals ain't squat, I had three years in the toxic mud of the East River -- I gotta wear a light proof body suit to keep from exposing the paper.
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  2. #22
    glbeas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwmullet
    Hrm..... now that's something I hadn't thought of before. Of course, I'm pretty sure you need to be a certified open water diver to get a tank charged -- I think I've had to show my dive card when doing that if the shop didn't already know me.

    Any of the SCUBA types on apug got idea on how you'd connect the valve on the tank to a hose with a standard compresser "squeeze and squirt" handle? It'd be nice not to have to buy an entire regulator rig just to do this, although maybe one could be found on eBay that has just the valve and the low-pressure part that attaches to the boyancy control vest.

    -KwM-
    Heck if you are going that route you may as well go to the welding shop and get a tank of nitrogen like I did. Hook up a regulator to it made for the high psi, an acetlene rig will usually suffice. Only cost a few dollars for a refill.
    Gary Beasley

  3. #23
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    Hey -- will Nitrogen sink in regular air? If memory serves, it's something like 60-80% of "air". When not blowing off dust, you could use the Nitrogen to displace the air in your chemistry bottles.

  4. #24
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    Cool pix. Come on , show us one where you are coming out of a sewage!

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by eric
    Cool pix. Come on , show us one where you are coming out of a sewage!
    Close as I can find for ya. Had to flatbed an old instamatic pic.
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  6. #26
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    Cool!! That qualifies as having a "sh***y" job You kind look like you are coming up for freash air!

    But you must LOVE diving to do it. I had a friend who was a real "sh*t" shoveler. He shovled it at the horse stables at the track. THAT! was a sh**y job!

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by eric
    Cool!! That qualifies as having a "sh***y" job You kind look like you are coming up for freash air!

    But you must LOVE diving to do it. I had a friend who was a real "sh*t" shoveler. He shovled it at the horse stables at the track. THAT! was a sh**y job!
    :o
    Imitation cameras come with big egos, real cameras do not include accessories.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by glbeas
    Heck if you are going that route you may as well go to the welding shop and get a tank of nitrogen like I did. Hook up a regulator to it made for the high psi, an acetlene rig will usually suffice. Only cost a few dollars for a refill.
    I’ve been monitoring for a day, and seen some rather bizarre ideas. Gary's suggestion is a most ideal one. As he stated the regulator is the most expensive and AFAIK the tank is relatively cheap and the gas very cheap. I have ysed this system for decades with great success. I have a couple of compressors (one is a diaphragm compressor-vacuum) and both require extensive moisture trapping and filtration at least for air brushing (I used to make model train stuff).

    Nitrogen/argon tank gas is almost pure with no danger of entrained water or oil. It is available in most welding shops or directly from the supplier. I have Lindy or whoever deliver to my door.
    I love the smell of fixer in the morning. It smells like...creativity!
    Truly, dr bob.

  9. #29

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    I do a lot of painting and providing clean, dry air is a pain. I have a commercial level compressor and run a water trap, a 5 micron particulate filter, and a coalescing filter.

    The water trap takes out about 50 percent of the moisture, the particulate filter is good for dust particles, the coalescing filter takes out the rest of the water and any oil from the compressor.

    For the price of those filters alone, you could get a nitrogen or CO2 tank, and a dual guage setup. The "air" will be cleaner and dryer than what you'll get out of a compressor setup. The dual guage setup will allow you read the pressure in the tank (guage 1) and set the outflow pressure (guage 2). If you want do it differently, get a guage and a flow meter.

    With a flow meter, you can set a very low constant flow rate (like 5 or 10 cubic feet per hour). With a dual guage setup, you would set the out going gas pressure in pounds per square inch or Pascals (if you're metrically inclined).

    If you go the guage route, make sure the guages are compatible with the type of gas you're using. The orfice sizes are different inside the guages to account for the different gas types. In other words, you don't want to use an acetylene guage with nitrogen.

    Flow meters are a different deal. They don't really care about the gas type, the just flow the amount of gas you set.

  10. #30
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    Just another alternative. A friend has used a CO2 tank (for carbonated soda fountains ... big stuff) for many a years for blowing off dust. Clean and not expensive (since he had the tank already) to fill when he ran out.

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