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  1. #1
    snaggs's Avatar
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    Colour printing with a jobo cpp3?

    I just realised Ive never seen an analogue colour enlargement. Im young enough to have gotten into photography when light jets were dominating labs.

    Ive been curious but intimidated by colour prints. Id thought it was maybe too late to start learning, but then the Jobo CPP3 came out, its nice to know if I go to the trouble of setting up a darkroom that spares etc wont vanish.

    Also, the jobo cpp3 sounds like something which could add a bit of structure to process for someone whos never done printing. I dont mind the cost. Seen what a 42" Epson costs?

    Can anyone who uses a jobo comment on how difficult RA4 is with a jobo?

    Daniel.

  2. #2
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Daniel;

    I have made up to 40 prints in one evening with my Jobo. It is a snap. Except for the darkroom becoming a bit warm and humid !

    I use 100F or 38C for the process with a 30" prewet, 1' dev, 30" stop and 2' blix. Then I rinse in the drum and then place into a tray of water until my printing session is done. I wash all prints at one time in running water for about 5' at 85F. I use the RA-RT color developer from Kodak (or equivalent) and I use a 2% acetic acid stop.

    The biggest warning or caution I might give is to make sure that the drum is dry for re-use, and make sure your hands are dry.

    Have fun! I do.

    PE

  3. #3
    L Gebhardt's Avatar
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    I've had the good luck with using the Jobo for prints, and do it basically the same as PE.

    As far as drying the drums, it is very important. I use two sets of drums so I can dry one while the other is processing. A hair dryer on low helps get the final bit of moisture out that the paper towels mis.

    You could also look into getting a roller transport machine such as the Durst Printo or and Ilford ICP. I found one of each for cheap a few years ago and now only use the Jobo for larger prints, or short sessions. They are more convenient if you wish to do a lot of prints. But the Jobo is fast to setup and take down.

  4. #4
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    I use a CPP2+, it does RA4 faultlessly.

    The hardest bit is keeping contrast in control (only high-contrast papers are available) so I use pulled C41 to help there... also in the jobo.

  5. #5

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    I tried a Jobo for colour printing years ago and failed miserably. Too much hassle to clean out and dry the drum between prints. I changed to a 12x16 NOVA deep tank slot processor and the task was transformed. No between-print cleaning or drying and the work-flow was quick. Replenishment of the Dev, stop bath and bleach fix = 100cc's per 800 sq inches (10 x 10"x8" sheets or equivalent) The 3 solutions were never changed for at least 12 months before it was cleaned out and a new prime solution refilled.

    There is a price advantage too. A slot processor for 12x16 inch paper is a lot less than that for a Nova CPP3 processor - less than 1/4 of the price. A 20x16 is about a third.

    About the only downside of the NOVA processor is to fill the slots in a 12x16 model you need about 2 litres of developer, stop and bleach fix. But this is balanced by the long life when they are used.
    Last edited by BMbikerider; 10-23-2012 at 06:08 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #6

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    I prefer 84F and 2 min dev time because the fill and drain cycle will be a little less critical. RA4 is pretty easy as long as your chemicals are reasonably fresh and your temperature is accurate.
    Don't forget good ventilation - important with all chemicals, but esp color. And I prefer Kodak RA/RT
    chemistry.

  7. #7
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    Although it was not the topic of the thread, i actually use 20C a lot and process in trays.

    PE

  8. #8

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    A little trick I came up with when color printing with my CPA2. When I try to figure out color filtration and exposure times, I don't use the drums for test strips. Instead, I use about 4x5 test strips. I expose a strip under the enlarger, roll it into a cylinder and process it directly in the beakers with chemistry: 1 min developer, quick rinse under running water and 1 min in blix. This way I don't spend time on rinse and drum washing just for the test strips - a quick 3min turnaround time for each test strip. Once I think I'm close to the exposure and filtration, I then fire up the whole sheet in the drum. Speeds things up dramatically.

    Eugene.
    P.S. Obviously, wear gloves when hand-dunking the test strips into chemistry. I get those 100-pack latex disposables and get new pair after each processing.

  9. #9
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    I don't ever wash or dry drums, I use a prewash to get even development. The normal paper-washing process gets the drum clean enough for the next sheet.

  10. #10

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    I never dry drums when I work with color papers at Jobo processor. For quicker work I use this sequence: 1´ prewash, 1´developer, 30"stop (2% acetic acid), 30" wash. Now I get out prints from drum and put them into blix, which is in the larger tray. Now I put the new papers into drum and all repeats. When the next ones are developed, I get out prints from blix, put them into tray with water and after session I wash them with running water.

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