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  1. #11
    eddie's Avatar
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    I use the sump pump into a 30 (or 40) gallon plastic trash can. It only needs to run about 15 feet, to my utility sink/drain. Like Drew said, the chemicals will corrode it fairly quickly if you're not careful. I don't dump my trays into it. I dump directly into the utility sink, but the pump helps with spillage, and sink cleaning. I just make sure to add a good bit of clean water to the trash can before turning on the pump. This seems to help extend the life of the pump, but they won't last forever. I think I'm on my third in about 20 years.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by jackbaty View Post
    My basement darkroom is terrific except for the fact that my basement has no running water. Or more accurately, no way to drain water. I would like to add a sink and am looking for the best (relatively inexpensive) way to do that.

    I'm thinking something like this Sink Pump would work...

    http://www.homedepot.com/buy/flotec-...0s1800lts.html

    Price is good, but reviews all seem to mention noise. Anyone here tried this and have a better suggestion?

    Thanks!
    I use pretty much the same unit in my darkroom FWIW.

  3. #13
    DarkroomDan's Avatar
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    For the past 12 years I have been using an inclosed pump similar to the Home Depot pump in the original post. Other than replacing the automatic shut-off switch about 1-1/2 years ago I have had no problems with it. It is a little noisy but at the rate it pumps out the tank it doesn't run for long. A sump pump would be quieter but I did not want to break up the concrete floor in my basement.

    My darkroom gets a lot of use and, since I do Gum printing and Carbon Transfer printing, I go through a lot of water. My pump has served me well.
    Daniel Williams
    Enumclaw WA USA

  4. #14

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    An additional note about dumping chemistry into the sump. Don't, as the fitting will corrode. Personal experience there.

    I dump chemistry into a bucket for disposal upstairs. Wash water and residualk amounts are not an issue.

    J.

  5. #15
    Trond's Avatar
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    My pump solution: http://www.apug.org/forums/forum43/9...nage-pump.html

    Still working. Always used under supervision. The pump was inexpensive, so no big deal if it fails.


    Trond

  6. #16

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    I've used a similar set up in my darkroom to pump six feet up to my main sewer line for the last 19 years.

    The only problem which forced me to replace the original unit was due to the tank developing a crack. I do not find this system to be noisy and as I work exclusively with fiber base paper I put a good volume through it.

    I used PVC pipe exclusively in all of the plumbing to eliminate any corrosion issues. One important thing to keep in mind if you go this route is to place a check valve on the line from the pump to a point just before the connection to the sewer line. This will prevent back flow back into the tank after the pump shuts off and will prevent any overflow if for some reason you experience a sewer back up.

  7. #17
    jackbaty's Avatar
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    Terrific information here. I'm going to give the sink pump from Home Depot a whirl. I don't typically need very much water, so I believe this will get me what I need. Good advice on the check valves and corrosion concerns.

    I've lived without water in the darkroom for several years. It's now about making things more convenient. Thanks for all the input.
    ----
    Jack Baty
    Director of Unspecified Services
    http://jackbaty.com | Flickr
    @jackbaty

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by lensman_nh View Post
    An additional note about dumping chemistry into the sump. Don't, as the fitting will corrode. Personal experience there.

    I dump chemistry into a bucket for disposal upstairs. Wash water and residualk amounts are not an issue.

    J.
    I am on my second pump in 20 years. Submersible and automatic level sesitive, sealed and corrosion resistant. Sunk a pit in the cellar floor lined with heavy duty polythene dustbin - the cellar floods to a depth of a few inches every few years or so which gives the pump a good workout and keeps the floor pretty well dry. At least the labels don't float off my wine bottles.
    So far as chemicals go, everything goes down the plug-hole, but I make sure the taps are full on when pouring chemicals out.
    Richard
    PS Make sure the pump is powerful enough to get the waste up to where it is going - mine has to lift about 12 ft.

  9. #19

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    After I posted my previous reply I remembered a couple more things. On the check valve issue I realized that I had installed two check valves. The one to prevent back flow into the tank is located right by the tanks discharge. The second one is up at the sewer line to prevent the sewer pipe overflow.

    Also I designed the plumbing connections to the tank to be easily disconnected in case I needed to repair or change the entire assembly. The connections between the tank and the discharge line and the tubing from the sink drain to the tank are connected by the use of rubber Fernco style couplings which detach by means of loosening the hose clamps which tighten the coupling to the pipe.

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