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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by laser View Post
    Don't forget that the flames in heating units also emit light.
    As do luminous watches... apparently!


    Steve.

  2. #22

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    It would be a very good idea to use positive ventilation - knock a hole in an internal wall and install a fan to push the air into the room instead of pulling it out. This is better for dust too because you can filter the air going into the room from the rest of the house.
    A politician is a man who will double cross that bridge when he comes to it.

    Oscar Levant

  3. #23
    AgX
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    What would be the disadvantages of positive pressure ventilation?
    One could be that lab air is pressed into other rooms. Any more?

  4. #24

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    Without it, the flue gases from the existing hot water tank would be drawn into the room by the exhaust fan instead of going up the chimney. All that is needed is a fan of the same cfm rating as the exhaust fan, and they both should be on the same power switch.
    Bob

  5. #25
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob-D659 View Post
    Without it, the flue gases from the existing hot water tank would be drawn into the room by the exhaust fan instead of going up the chimney.
    we need to know if the burner is sealed to the room or if it draws its air from the room in order to make a statement to that effect.


    Steve.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob-D659 View Post
    Without it, the flue gases from the existing hot water tank would be drawn into the room by the exhaust fan instead of going up the chimney...
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    we need to know if the burner is sealed to the room or if it draws its air from the room in order to make a statement to that effect...
    Look at photo three in post #18. The hot water heater is an atmospheric gas-fired type that draws combustion air from the room in which it's installed and vents its exhaust via convection through a galvanized steel stove-pipe chimney. As opposed to the space heating furnace, which is a sealed-combustion condensing type, drawing outside air through one PVC pipe and venting its exhaust through a second PVC pipe.

    Balanced ventilation of the space is definitely necessary to avoid problems with water heater exhaust gas. I still wouldn't do this without installing a fast-acting, low-level carbon monoxide detector. Better yet, partition off the furnace and water heater as suggested in post #9. I'd rather see you go digital than die in a darkroom.

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob-D659 View Post
    Without it, the flue gases from the existing hot water tank would be drawn into the room by the exhaust fan instead of going up the chimney. All that is needed is a fan of the same cfm rating as the exhaust fan, and they both should be on the same power switch.
    Oooh. Good solution.
    A politician is a man who will double cross that bridge when he comes to it.

    Oscar Levant

  8. #28

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    Steve, that style of hot water tank has been the norm in the US and Canada for decades. Easily identifiable from the photo as Sal wrote.

    Even if the tank and furnace are partitioned off, there has to be a good sized vent grill to the open area of the basement/house.
    Bob

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob-D659 View Post
    Steve, that style of hot water tank has been the norm in the US and Canada for decades.
    It is the type which was banned here decades ago - and for good reason.


    Steve,

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob-D659 View Post
    ...Even if the tank and furnace are partitioned off, there has to be a good sized vent grill to the open area of the basement/house.
    Yes, and even that relies on the house being leaky enough so outside air can enter. A space that's sealed from the rest of the house but communicates directly with the outside would be better. Heating appliance manufacturers specify the free vent area in their Installation and Operation manuals.

    It's unfortunate that so much of this continent heats with "scorched air." If the OP's house used a sealed combustion boiler and hot water space heating, his comfort level would be higher and an indirect tank could be installed for domestic hot water too. Then there would be no need to consider these venting matters when planning his darkroom.

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