Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 68,686   Posts: 1,482,323   Online: 944
      
Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 42
  1. #31
    Steve Smith's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Ryde, Isle of Wight
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    8,428
    Images
    122
    I'm amazed at the size of the thing. In Europe, this would heat and provide hot water for a whole house without the need for header tanks or cylinders:

    http://www.valleyserviceslimited.co....us-Boiler1.jpg

    http://www.boilers2go.co.uk/userfile...Dimensions.jpg


    Steve.

  2. #32

    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Winnipeg, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,301
    Sal, if he was in a climate like yours, he likely wouldn't have a basement.

    Nothing wrong with scorched air heating, it's usually more efficient than a boiler, and much lower in capital cost.
    Bob

  3. #33
    Diapositivo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Rome, Italy
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,844
    For what I know, you never (never) extract air from a room where a furnace works, unless the furnace is mounted in camera stagna, with sealed air intake and air exhaust, so that it is isolated from the air in the room.

    On the other hand, a darkroom should have some kind of forced ventilation to reduce the amount of vapour of chemistry breathed by the printer.

    I would seriously separate the two environments, each of them having an independent air source and air exhaust, and no air-pressure cross-effect between them.
    A better solution would be to build a small "room" outside the outside, leaning on the outer wall, and moving there the furnace. Or changing the furnace and properly installing a "sealed chamber" one.

    I would not attempt to balance the air flows.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  4. #34

    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    788
    That heating/water installation is really incredibly huge! Or compared to here (Holland) anyway, but we only get down to minus 15C or so in the Winter - and that for only a few weeks.

    As the burner(s) is apparently drawing combustion-air from it's surroundings I wouldn't put myself down there. Like others have said, can you partition the basement and give the burner it's own inlet and outlet? Then a filtered positive-pressure ventilator for the darkroom can work completely separately from your heating, perhaps with heated air from another part of the house in the Winter, so that you will be pushing clean air into your space instead of sucking in dust all the time.

  5. #35

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Castle Rock, CO, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,173
    Images
    54
    For at least 30 years US building code has mandated an outside air inlet somewhere near the furnace and WH. This was done when houses started being more airtight. It's usually an insulated, flexible duct hanging down from the ceiling to a few inches off the floor. I don't see one in the pics. How old is this house?
    A politician is a man who will double cross that bridge when he comes to it.

    Oscar Levant

  6. #36

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Central Florida, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,810
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    I'm amazed at the size of the thing. In Europe, this would heat and provide hot water for a whole house without the need for header tanks or cylinders:

    http://www.valleyserviceslimited.co....us-Boiler1.jpg

    http://www.boilers2go.co.uk/userfile...Dimensions.jpg


    Steve.


    Steve,

    We (in US) have the type you mentioned (on demand heating type) also but they are not very popular. Mine is 40 gallon (144 liters) in capacity. I think the one OP has is even bigger. They serve as a hot water storage tank as well as being a heater.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  7. #37
    Stephanie Brim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Iowa
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,607
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    21
    I want one of the on demand ones, but they're quite pricy and I can't get my husband to agree with me. They do save you money, though.

    As to the OP, this is one of the reasons I'm going to ask my husband to switch around the way the bedrooms are in the house: I want the kids to be upstairs and us downstairs. I can then put my darkroom/office in what is right now my daughter's room, and I won't have the issues I'll have if I have to be down the basement.

    I need an office with water anyway. I dye yarn. It'll be nicer to have a room that is dedicated to my arts/crafts than trying to have it all over the house.
    No idea what's going to happen next, but I'm hoping it involves being wrist deep in chemicals come the weekend.

  8. #38
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    11,578
    Images
    59
    The on demand heaters aren't really designed to provide continuous delivery of warmed water over an extended time.

    Now who on APUG would want something that supplies continuous delivery of warmed water over an extended time.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  9. #39
    Bill Burk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    2,909
    Images
    46
    I tried to visualize what you have to work with and think you might wall in the furnace and water heater if it's legal and safe. Forget the door to your office.

    Give them an upside-down "L" shaped room of their own. Sort of like an upside-down Idaho with a vented door at the Canadian border. Solves all your ventilation issues.

    This leaves your darkroom as a right-side up "L" with a large 5 x 9 main work area plus a vestibule.

    My first thought was to have the sink against back wall and the door to the left of the sink. That way you can open the door soon as the white lights are on... and it would be convenient to walk out to the laundry tub and wash your trays and tanks there.

    If you did that, the vestibule should be a comfortable fit for the enlarger and a dry side shelf. The 9 foot walkway along the sink could be left open or you could put a narrow chemical storage shelf / bookshelf behind where you walk.

  10. #40
    bono66's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Niagara Falls Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    11
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0294.jpg 
Views:	10 
Size:	511.6 KB 
ID:	60004Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0295.jpg 
Views:	10 
Size:	573.9 KB 
ID:	60005

    When we first started the demo my furnace and water tank were in a little closed in area. We think they tore down a wall to install the furnace I have been in the house for 7 years furnace was new when we moved in. water tank I had put in right after we moved in. I thought by taking down that little wall I would be able to open up the work area a bit. I hope these photos are helping because all this advise I am getting is really helping me. I want to do this right and safe and I thank you all for the input.

Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin