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  1. #1

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
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    New York
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    Favorite develping tank?

    For the past few years I've been using the Patersen tanks exclusively for 120 and 4x5 either with the taco method or with the mod54. Recently I was given some Nikor tanks and aside from getting used to the loading of the film on the reels, they seem much, much better to me. They don't leak, they are smaller so I can rotate them with one hand and take less chemicals which is always good. I can't think of a downside them them yet.

    What is everybody using for thanks for their 120 or 35mm, has anyone moved away from Pattersen like me?

  2. #2

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    Sep 2007
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    Richmond VA.
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    I still use the Patterson tank because it is the only one I have.

    Jeff

  3. #3

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    Jun 2011
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    I'm using the Arista SS tank with Hewes reels for 35mm and 120, and I really like it (mostly for the same reasons you mentioned). A couple additional advantages of SS are better heat transfer (if using a tempering bath) and that you can reload without waiting for the reels to completely dry.

  4. #4
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
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    Aug 2006
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    Misissauaga Canada
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    I have 2 - 2 35mm reel high, and one 5 35mm reel high plastic Paterson series 4 (and a few earlier generation ones and generic reels) tanks, and a one high 35mm and 2 high 35mm and 4 high 35mm stanless steel tanks. Toal of 5 35mm ss 35mm and 2-120 ss reels. For 4x5 large format I have 12 4x5 hangers, and a set of 4 4x5 rubber tanks with floating lids, and a light tight one that takes only 1l, and will take 6 hangers at a time.

    For b&w roll film, I use mostly the Paterson tanks. I always like to use 500mL of chemistry per 35mm or 120 film, particularly if it is d-76 1:1, or fx-37 1:3.

    For c-41 or e-6 work with 35mm I usually use the stainless steel, since I usually mix c-41 and e-6 in 1L quantities and that almost exactly fills this tank, and it wasily fits into my tempering tank.
    For 120 it is a toss up. If I have 4- rolls of 120 c-41 backlogged, I will load 2 end to end per Paterson reel, and then can process 4 at once in the 5-35mm reel high tank using the same 1L of replenished c-41 or e-6 chemistry. If only 2 rolls, I may use the 4 reel high stainless steel tank.

    BTW, I use the same e-6 bleach and c-41 fix for both processes. They keep, and less stock to store on the shelves. I do not mix the colour and B&W fixes.

    For 4x5 in b&w I use the big tanks, dev, stop, fix. For colour I use the smaller daylight tank becuase it can share my 1-l of chems usually mixed for the smaller formats.
    For e-6 and c-41 the RB, stop, bleach, pre bleach and fix use the 4 floating lid tanks. They take 1.5L of chems, so U usually have a 1L bottle and 500mL bottle of each of these.

    I let my e-6 and c-41 work pile up, so as to process at least 4 rolls before mixing fresh chems if the replenished stuff has sat unused for too long to trust it.

    I tend to also let my b&w pile up to some degree as well. I'm not Winogrand, but I do understand his idea of letting the shooting moment leave you, and let the contact sheets stand on thier own as to their content after the film is processed.
    my real name, imagine that.

  5. #5

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    Jul 2010
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    Definitely stainless steel all the way.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  6. #6
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Aug 2004
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    West Midlands, UK, and Turkey
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    I've used stainless steel and Paterson and for 35mm & 120 much prefer Paterson tanks which I've been using since Series II, taht shows my age

    Ian

  7. #7

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    Jul 2011
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    Canada
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    Using Jobo tanks for 35mm, 120, and trying them out for 4x5. I do have one or two Nikor stainless steel, but they are not seeing much use now. The older bakelite Ansco tank with the thermometer in the middle is also unused.

  8. #8
    Herzeleid's Avatar
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    Oct 2008
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    Ankara/Turkey
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    I have Kaiser, AP, Paterson plastic tanks and one LPL steel tank. All with reels for 120 and 135. Even though I like steel tanks, I often use AP reels with Paterson.
    I plan to stick with Paterson and AP reels for a long long time.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
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    Seattle
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    I have 2- and 3-reel Patterson tanks and 1, 2 and 3-reel Nikon tanks. I almost always use the Patterson reels because they are easier to fill and empty and because I find the reels easier to load, particularly for 120. My major complaint is that the lids are hard to get on tightly; I probably lose all of the time saved pouring in the developer while trying to get the lid on all the way.

    Regarding heat transfer, I assumed that plastic, as a better insulator, would keep the temperature more even: no heat increase from handling the tank during agitation, although that would be very minor.

  10. #10
    Alan W's Avatar
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    May 2009
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    Tennessee
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    Patterson,always.I abandoned stainless back in the '90's and couldn't go back now.

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