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  1. #11

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    I was thinking of buying a bigger one. Drilling a hole for a drain and then using the thing for a print washer. Only thing is I'm not sure what to use to keep the prints apart.

  2. #12
    BWGirl's Avatar
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    Hey Nick!

    Here's a link to a thread that came up earlier about building inexpensive print washers.
    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum43/8967-how-build-inexpensive-print-washer.html
    Hope this helps!
    Jeanette
    .................................................. ................
    Isaiah 25:1

  3. #13
    Mongo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena
    I was thinking of buying a bigger one. Drilling a hole for a drain and then using the thing for a print washer. Only thing is I'm not sure what to use to keep the prints apart.
    Aha! Another one of my "el-cheapo" pieces. I bought a vertical storage tray, some cheap plexiglass, and a short piece of hose. I glued the plexiglass in place vertically in the storage tray, leaving room at the bottom. I snaked the hose down under the slots and I just turn on the water. The water fills the tank and just overflows the top. The whole thing sits in my laundry tub and I can wash 16 8x10 prints at a time.
    Film is cheap. Opportunities are priceless.

  4. #14
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    Many years ago, and I';m really sorry I can remember who was the inventor of these, I received instructions on how to make a print washer using plastic bins (i used a square bathroom trashcan).

    You needed:
    - The plastic bin
    - Hose attachment (1female, 1 male)
    - Some nylon thread (fishing thread of something thicker)
    - 5 minute epoxy

    1. Poke a hole (about 3/4") and attach the female hose attachment to the bottom side of the bin.
    2 Poke another hole for the exit hose at the top of the opposite side and attach the hose.
    3. With a ruler mark vertical lines that will be where you want your prints to be standing "vertically" on both sides of the bin (about 7mm appart).
    4. Poke holes about 7mm apart on those lines and start "weaving" the nylon thread so that prints will be separated
    According to the instructions it was best to make a "lattice" with the thread, by weaving thorugh every other hole going from both ends.
    5. After the nylon thread was weaved I used 5 minute epoxy to seal the holes.

    I ttook me a good day and a half to finish it but I thought it was a satisfactory washer for 8x10s.


    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena
    I was thinking of buying a bigger one. Drilling a hole for a drain and then using the thing for a print washer. Only thing is I'm not sure what to use to keep the prints apart.
    Mama took my APX away.....

  5. #15
    DeanC's Avatar
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    The 11x14 version of the Vesalab washer is currently onsale for $185. Given a full time job and a 15 month old running around my house, a day and a half is easily worth $185. I like cheap as much as the next guy but sometimes DIY costs more in time than you save in $$$.

    Dean

  6. #16

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    The problem is once you get over 11x14 prices start climbing fast. I can get brand new 11x14 trays for $4.50 Canadian. They're Praff [IIRC]. Wouldn't hurt if they were a touch deeper but other then that perfect for me. 16x20 Praff trays are 4X the price. Over that size it gets worse. Other brands are much more expensive. Wouldn't be a big issue if I made a lot of big prints but when I mostly make 8x10s the cost of a set of 16x20 trays starts adding quite a bit to the cost of each print made. So cheap big trays for light use is a bonus for me.

  7. #17

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    Just to jump in here. All of my Hydroponics reservoirs are walmart specials. The only one that flexes is the 45 gallon container. And that only happens at the top. I have two underbed storage containers as small reservoirs and were filled the top with solution and did not flex. All you have to worry about is them drying out and cracking under large wattage HID lamps. Not a common practice in darkroom work so that means no worries at all.

    To add to what titrisol said. Instead of all the cutting and fitting of thereads that will leak just drop a hoe from the top to the bottom and cut a drain hole on the other side. Easy as sin and has worked to flush hydroponics reservoirs for years.
    Just my 2 cents.
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  8. #18
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    I read on the pure-silver list about another guy who used cat litter tray as well. I was at the kitchen supply store and they sell large flat plastic containers. Very well built. Built to withstand someone throwing into a commerical washer.

    BUT...someone suggest to epoxy little plastic things on the bottom so the prints don't get stuck. Good idea I think...

  9. #19
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    Food service basins, trays, whatever you want to call them, are great. I got mine for about $6 each at Smart & Final. They're about 13x17" and about 5" deep and are made of a heavy grade gray plastic (about 18% gray in fact). They're normally used to bus dishes in restaurants. I use mine to wash prints but will be getting more. The plastic is pliable enough to work with and won't shatter so it might be easy enough to convert with hoses, etc. into a proper washer...

    S

  10. #20
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    Years ago, I read in a book or one of the photo mags about processing the occasional "mural" sized print. The technique was to build a frame from wood (1x4's, for instance) the size needed and then use a sheet of heavy plastic as a liner. It would work, but would be fragile. In more recent times I've seen this same technique used to build a basin for soaking wooden parts being stripped of paint on a remodeling site.

    I've even read of people doing really large prints (I don't know where the paper comes from) by doing them on the floor with the chemicals in buckets and using a mop to "paint" the developer and fix. I don't think I'd want to try that one.

    There are always alternatives. On a practical level, one is more limited by the sizes of paper available and the room to process it, rather than trays or chemicals.

    Cheers, y'all.

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