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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by rwreich View Post
    I also was not planning on wiping down the film because I have been cautioned against scratching it using that method. My plan was to just let it dry in a well ventilated area. That may not work, but I want to see if I can get away with it before touching the emulsion side.
    Yeah, don't squeegee your film! There is no point. You don't even need a well ventilated area. I just hang my film on the shower rod. That's it. If you leave it overnight it will be dry in the morning. One word of caution though is water can pool in parts of the clip and take longer to dry. I usually snip off the leaders that are connected to the clips rather than disturbing the clips. What will happen is occasionally everything will look nice and dry and then you will grab the clip to take the film off the shower rod and a little drop of water will roll down the film!

    Quote Originally Posted by rwreich View Post
    I appreciate the word about not being too sensitive about temperature control during the final stages. That has been one of the unknowns in my thoughts. Thanks again for sharing your thoughts.
    Lol. No problem. In the beginning it is tough to tell what to obsess about. I've made my share of mistakes and eventually figured out what I can be somewhat sloppy about and what demands precision. The actual developing part is where I would be neurotic. That is the place where things can really go wrong and irreparable harm can occur. If you don't do an adequate stop bath the worst that will happen is you will exhaust your fixer quickly. If you do an inadequate fix then before cutting your film put it back on the reel, soak it in water, and fix it for a few more minutes.

    The hardest part for me is getting the film on the reels!

  2. #22
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    My 2 cents, your mileage might vary and whatnot, but in my experience I've never managed to mess up developing of negatives, except on 2 occasions (one was due to Kodak's inability to get their development times for HC110 right), and the other time I was trying to push Tri-X to 12500 ASA in Rodinal, which was doomed to fail anyhow), so don't worry so much. Basically, all you need is developer, fixer and water, all the other stuff is twist that you add as you go along, except maybe distilled water if your tap water is rich in calcium or otherwise undrinkable.

    About temperature, it's only really critical at the developing stage, and as long as you are within a degree of the "ideal" temp, you'll be fine. If your development temperature is more than a couple degrees from room temp, I usually start a degree north or south of my ideal temp (i.e. if your room temp is over your dev temp, start a degree cold, and vice versa). After that, you only need to be within 5 degrees of ideal, 20-25C maybe. Of course you shouldn't get cavalier with the temperature just because you can, as precise as possible is always good, but don't worry so much about it either that you forget to have fun.

    About stop baths, wash aids and other great things; you do not need them! I stopped in water for a minute and rinsed in water with washing soap for 4 years before getting anything fancier, and I can't say that I see any difference in results after adding all these frills. The only really great thing that I'd say is mandatory is 2 bath fixing, basically you mix 2 batches of fixer, and fix 2,5 min in the first, and 2.5 min in the second, and when your first bath gets full of silver and stops working, you get rid of it, mix a new batch, and use the old second bath as first bath. This way, you're always fixing optimally, as well as minimizing the use of fixer.

    To your credit though, you have a lot better understanding of what you're doing going in than what did when I started out, I just bought some random chems and an old leaky tank from my local photo store and went to town.
    Canon F1n / FTb / AE-1P | Yashica Mat-124G | Hasselblad 500C/M | Leica IIIf

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Noble View Post
    If you don't do an adequate stop bath the worst that will happen is you will exhaust your fixer quickly.

    The hardest part for me is getting the film on the reels!
    1) One has to get rid of potassium salts, if there are any in the developer. Rodinal is a good example of potassium-containing developer. The reason is that potassium thiosulphate is inactive as fixer. If potassium salts are carried over into the fixer, it will exhaust and fail to work a lot sooner.

    2) Yes, getting film onto reel can sometimes be tricky. I do not struggle with Ilford, Kodak or Fuji, but some of the others are a real PITA. Foma comes to mind. I'd sooner spool a strip of clingwrap. Maybe the newer Foma films have a better base. What reels do you use? I have no luck with the stainless steel reels, and have happily standardised on Paterson reels. Others swear by stainless reels. Whatever you use, the best in my opinion is to sacrifice a roll, maybe one for which development failed for some reason, and use that to practice with in daylight.

  4. #24

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    If I could slip a question into the excellent discussion...

    i've only done 4 rolls so far (two double batches, all Tri-X) and the first batch had a bit of curl....not too bad...but more than I'd have hoped for. The second had some serious curl, both longitudinally and in the way that it was wrapped on the reel. If there any change I can make in my process to minimize curl?

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cold View Post
    If I could slip a question into the excellent discussion...

    i've only done 4 rolls so far (two double batches, all Tri-X) and the first batch had a bit of curl....not too bad...but more than I'd have hoped for. The second had some serious curl, both longitudinally and in the way that it was wrapped on the reel. If there any change I can make in my process to minimize curl?
    Try drying the film slower. You will tend to get better drying in a slightly humid environment.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  6. #26

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    Thank you!

    The more I learn, the more I see I messed up big time in the way I dried the second batch (in front of the heater vent), as they had a lot of curl and a lot of dust. I'll likely kill both birds with one stone next time!

  7. #27
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cold View Post
    Thank you!

    The more I learn, the more I see I messed up big time in the way I dried the second batch (in front of the heater vent), as they had a lot of curl and a lot of dust. I'll likely kill both birds with one stone next time!
    Many of us here find it works well to hang the film in an enclosed shower or over a bathtub with the curtain drawn.

    If your humidity is low, it can be a good idea to run the water in the tub or shower briefly before hanging the film.

    Just don't forget the film is there before your next shower .
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  8. #28

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    Thank you all for the awesome commentary and advice. I had not responded to this thread in a while, but wanted to let you know that I had success on my first attempt. You can see some of the results on another APUG forum post that I started here:

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum37/115092-success.html

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