Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,502   Posts: 1,543,414   Online: 779
      
Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 55
  1. #11
    Roger Cole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Suburbs of Atlanta, GA USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,882
    White is best. I painted my last darkroom white and will do so when I build out the current one. The only light present should be safe. The wall color does affect how much safelight you can use but makes it easy to bounce safelights off the walls (and ceiling.) You should test and adjust the intensity in any case. You might have to dim your safelights a bit with white walls but you'll still have more even illumination at the same level.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Central Florida, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,920
    Also... Don't forget the ceiling!

    I have white walls and white ceiling. When I burn in my prints, I can tell areas that was not supposed to gain any exposure does. My enlarger, Omega D2 leaks light horizontally and UP. Obviously, reflected lights are reaching my paper on baseboard.

    I've seen some darkroom practioners create a black surround for enlarger only. That may be an option too.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Penfield, NY
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,027
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post
    White is best.
    Interesting. All the darkrooms I've worked in (including many at Kodak) were painted flat black.

  4. #14
    David Brown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    near Dallas, TX USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,301
    Images
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by Prof_Pixel View Post
    Interesting. All the darkrooms I've worked in (including many at Kodak) were painted flat black.
    Me, too - as far as darkrooms that were not my own, such as in schools. I think this was the accepted wisdom in the past, especially in darkrooms where more than one person might be working.

    However, the bottom line is that if the safelights are "safe", then the walls can be any color, so why not as light as possible. The exception is leaking enlargers, which is a separate problem that should be addressed.

  5. #15
    JBrunner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    6,780
    My darkroom is red. No hi jinx.

  6. #16
    AgX
    AgX is offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,596
    White is advisable as with less means you gain an even illumination.

    Comcerning reflectect exposure light bouncing back to the paper, a shielding of the paper can be applied. The most simple form would be a black painted section behind the enlarger. Alternative one could use a black roller blind. Also mobile shieldings at other sides of the enlarger. It's a question of weighing between the "trouble" of shielding versus the lighting efficiency gained by white walls.
    Local black shieldings could also be used in provisional darkroom. Think of black card/foamboard too.

    But what about the white shirt of the Apugger?? Thought about that?


    Jonathan,
    why not look for a wall-paint without optical brighteners? Are the paint buckets all sealed today? Otherwise make a check with a UV-lamp before buying.

  7. #17
    bobwysiwyg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Ann Arbor, MI U.S.A.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,555
    Images
    3
    But what about the white shirt of the Apugger?? Thought about that?
    Perfectly acceptable provided one is wearing a black tie.
    WYSIWYG - At least that's my goal.

    Portfolio-http://apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=25518

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    833
    Images
    42
    I have near-white walls. I also have white shelves, as it is a small space and there would be a lot of pockets of shadow without the reflection otherwise. I have a 'skirt' of blackout fabric around the carrier on one of my enlargers because it seems more prone to lateral light leakage and is closer to the wall than the other. On balance I think a neutral (white, or grey, or black) is better than a colour. Safelights can vary from red through orange to light brown, or green in a colour darkroom (though with my eyesight a dark green light is next to useless 8-) ). A neutral should be equally effective in all cases.

    A good washable surface is a good idea.
    I feel, therefore I photograph.

  9. #19
    Worker 11811's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Pennsylvania, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,620
    The walls in my projection room are royal blue. When I had them painted, people kind of looked at me funny but, after we got the room done, people liked it.

    When the lights go out for projection, they are indistinguishable from black and reflect nearly no light. When the lights are on, they don't look like a dark cavern like black paint would have.

    Everybody else was pushing for black but we have a few other rooms that have black walls. It's actually difficult to work in an all-black room. There is no detail in the walls. That makes it difficult to gain perspective and determine where objects are in the room, relative to each other. Blue walls give enough detail that it's comfortable to work.

    In my darkroom, the walls are wood paneling. Medium brown. I figure good enough.
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,721
    Quote Originally Posted by Prof_Pixel View Post
    Interesting. All the darkrooms I've worked in (including many at Kodak) were painted flat black.
    Flat black may have been a safeguard measure if the darkroom was also used for exposure and testing of total darkness materials (duplicating, copying etc) as Kodak recommends an all black darkroom for these purposes. But for a darkroom in which safelighting is acceptable Kodak recommends flat white for the ceiling. For the walls Kodak recommends white, cream, other light colours or a colour similar to that emitted by the safelight, while flat black is recommended for the wall directly behind the enlarger (or other panels nearby), and around any light locks. These recommendations were in Kodak pub. K-13 (Photolab Design) and are still in K-4 ("How Safe is Your Safelight?") under Placement of Safelights.

    Interestingly, in darkrooms where safelighting is used Kodak actually advises against painting the darkroom black. The explanation is that safelights will appear as "pools of light" on the dark background which apparently can cause eye fatigue.

Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin