Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,930   Posts: 1,556,849   Online: 941
      
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 34
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    SF Bay Area, California, US
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    279

    Enlarger turret for lens, how useful in a home darkroom?

    I got a 3 lens turret with my Omega D5 enlarger,
    It seems like a neat thing to have, but I wonder how practical it is for a home darkroom.
    I'm wondering if it is better to just use a single lens on a slide in lens mount.

    On the D5, when I change formats, besides the lens, I have to adjust the position/height of the lens carrier, so why not just swap lens boards at that time? I can see this if I was still in school where the guy printing would have to print from various sizes of film. But at home things are more stable, I am printing usually from just 1 film size. And I've never used a lens turret before, so I have no practical experience to compare it with a single lens setup.

    I would appreciate hearing from those of you who use a 3-lens turret on your enlarger.

    thanks

  2. #2
    Rick A's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    north central Pa
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,057
    Images
    33
    I use one on my D-6 Pro Lab with adjustable bellows and adjustable condensors. I'm set up with a 50mm, 90mm, and 135mm and cover 35mm, 6x6 and 6x9 with the 90mm, and 4x5. It's a snap to switch between formats. I don't think it would work with a machine that requires a different length cone for each format.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum

  3. #3
    David Brown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    near Dallas, TX USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,327
    Images
    7
    I used one on my D5. I only had one slide in lens board, so I would have had to unscrew and remount lenses to change.

  4. #4
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,054
    Images
    6
    I have a turret for my Beseler 45MX that I got on Ebay for cheap. It saves me having to switch lenses by unmounting the lens and mounting another lens if I switch printing different formats. I used to keep my 3 mounted lenses in a box wrapped in bubble wrap. Now all 3 are on a turret. It's handy, but not a necessity.
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Chicago, Western Suburbs
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,444
    Dear act12,

    I love mine (Omega D2 Dichroic Head). It won't work with my 40mm though. I have to keep that on a separate board, but they just slide in and out.

    Neal Wydra

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    SF Bay Area, California, US
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    279
    Are there any issues aligning the lens stage with a turret vs. a single lens?
    My turret "seems" ridged enough.

  7. #7
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    13,192
    Quote Originally Posted by Rick A View Post
    I use one on my D-6 Pro Lab with adjustable bellows and adjustable condensors. I'm set up with a 50mm, 90mm, and 135mm and cover 35mm, 6x6 and 6x9 with the 90mm, and 4x5. It's a snap to switch between formats. I don't think it would work with a machine that requires a different length cone for each format.
    I use a similar set up and it works well. If I were to use a 50mm or 90mm lens for 4"x5" the enlarger head would have to go through the easel. If I used the 135mm for 35mm film, the enlarge head would go through the ceiling.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  8. #8
    Vaughn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Humboldt Co.
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    4,692
    Images
    40
    They work fine. Unless it has be very used and abused, a turret should be no different than using a single lens board. (I have 7 seven turrets in use on D5-XLs -- all with 50mm, 80mm and 135mm lenses on them.) The 50's are all Nikkor 2.8 and I use a spacer to get them to clear when rotating the turret...another lens mount, for example.

    You might consider looking for an 80mm lens, also -- I find using one lens size up for small prints to be very nice. One is using the primo center section of the image circle that way -- and the enlarger does not have to be so low for small prints -- easier to work under...such as lifting the easel up to slip in the paper, for burning, etc. I use the 135mm for 6x6 negs for up to 8"x8" enlargements.

    Vaughn
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    SF Bay Area, California, US
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    279
    I have 50, 80, 135 and 150 lenses. The 80 and 135 came with the enlarger.
    I was planning to get a 105 for 6x9, but that depends on "IF" I get a 6x9 camera. The 105 would then replace the 135.

    My plan was to use 50(35mm)+80(6x6)+150(4x5) lenses on the turret.
    My other option would be 80(35mm)+135(6x6 & 6x9)+150(4x5) on the turret, and put the 50 on a single lens mount. Or, 50+80+135 on the turret and put the 150 on the single lens mount.

    Man this is getting more confusing that I thought.
    Interesting idea of going up one step in lens focal length, I had not thought of that. I do remember VERY SHORT exposures with the 50mm lens and small 4x5 prints. The only time I remember using longer lenses for 35mm was in high school when I had to make wallet size prints for the yearbook or newspaper. I could not get the enlarger head down far enough, so one of the other guys told me to use a longer lens...problem solved.

    Vaughn, you reminded me of something. In the local junior college, all the enlargers setup with 80mm lenses, you have to ask the teacher for a 50mm lens to make large prints from 35mm film. Except for the few students printing 11x14 or 16x20, the 80mm worked just fine for most of the students with 35mm film. Except for one gal who was trying to print 11x14 from 35mm film. She was standing on a stool to reach the focusing knob, the head was cranked up all the way to the top of the girder. The enlarger had an 80mm lens, and she did not know to ask the teacher for the 50mm lens when she made her large prints. Although I also think the 80mm lens was installed for convenience, since it handles both 35mm and 6x6 films w/o changing lens.

  10. #10
    Vaughn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Humboldt Co.
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    4,692
    Images
    40
    With the D5, the use of the 150mm requires one to remove the top condensor lens completely, and if I remember correctly, a piece of heat-absorbing glass is recommended. I have used the 135mm for 4x5 (for 16x20 prints) -- perhaps for 100s of different negatives over the years (but it has been 20+ years since I have done any serious amount of silver gelatin printing). It was fine, though I always ended up doing a bit of corner-burning...but may have done it with a 150mm lens anyway.

    We have the D5-XLs, which might have had a taller column than your old school's.

    I have recommended using a 135mm lens to students for very small prints from 35mm many times. Seeing them carrying in a box to put their easel on is a good clue!
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin