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  1. #21

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    I would WAIT, the price difference for the XL chassis is too much.
    With that $250 difference I could probably buy an Omega D2-XL.

    But as I mentioned, do you have the vertical clearance to install and use an XL chassis enlarger? If you do not have the vertical clearance, it is a moot point. I do not know how high the Bessler 23C-XL will be, but I would presume it would be similar to the Omega, a bit higher than 5 feet. If you can fit an XL chassis, I would go with an XL chassis. As for wall projection, you need to look at your darkroom. CAN you arrange the enlarger to easily wall project. The head of the 23C will pivot back, so as you face the enlarger, the lens will point towards you, so you will project onto the wall behind you. Other enlargers pivot so the head points to the left or right side.

    You can easily drill a hole in a tray. The problem will be to keep the hole from cracking into a BIG hole. For that you will have to figure out how to install a flange onto the tray. I have not tried it, so I don't know how to do it.

    You can find lower priced 2 blade easels, it is the 4 blade easels that are expensive.
    Alternative is to just tape the paper onto the baseboard.

    Yes, you can use a series of rinses, each rinse taking off more fixer, but it will take TIME to do. I would use the Kodak tray syphon instead.
    If you use RC (resin coated) paper, the wash time will be decreased a LOT, compared to fiber paper.

  2. #22

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    Thanks! It looks like I will have to wall project sine the 23c XL will only do 16x20. So, i think i can get a 23c regular with table and times for uner $200. I don't have time to wait for a cheaper one, so I think this will do. I have a lot of space for a darkroom since we have a two car garage and only one car. I plan to enclose an area with curtains, like a tent without a top, and board up the garage, and only develop/print at night.

    Another note, the work I am planning is often very surrealistic, blurred, hola-ish, and sometimes defocusing the whole image. Perfect developement is by far not my concern. But I do want to use FB paper because that is the quality standard.

    And thank you very much for the warning about the tray hole. I don't know what to do about it. Like someone else noted, emptying a tray so large would not be easy... But I have the room, so using three trays is fine, it's the price that is the issue. If I can find cheaper trays used or a tray alternative like someone mentioned (I'll have to check that again), then that might be the way to go. I do like the single tray method though because it seems easier as well as cheaper.

    And I am very glad to hear about the easels, but I will almost definitely be projecting onto the wall as far as I see it now.... However, I won't have an actual wall to use, since I will be in an enclosed "tent" area. I will need a standing wall of some sort. I was thinking I could find an old shelving unit, or maybe some kind of cheap tripod easel?

  3. #23
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    Just take the 23CXL off the baseboard and mount it to a heavy bracket attached to a wall.

    Then use a couple of different tables of different heights underneath.

    Make sure the bracket extends far enough from the wall.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Just take the 23CXL off the baseboard and mount it to a heavy bracket attached to a wall.

    Then use a couple of different tables of different heights underneath.

    Make sure the bracket extends far enough from the wall.
    Thank you. I would much rather go with the 23c regular since it is more than $250 cheaper, plus comes with table and timer, so it's an even greater value and i don't think finding something for a standing wall just to hold the print will not be a big issue.

    What do you think?

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by healingvirtue View Post
    Thank you. I would much rather go with the 23c regular since it is more than $250 cheaper, plus comes with table and timer, so it's an even greater value and i don't think finding something for a standing wall just to hold the print will not be a big issue.

    What do you think?
    The wall bracket will work just as well with the 23C.

    And a standing wall will be harder to align than a horizontal surface.

    And handling large paper is a fair bit easier on a horizontal surface.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by healingvirtue View Post
    Another note, the work I am planning is often very surrealistic, blurred, hola-ish, and sometimes defocusing the whole image. Perfect developement is by far not my concern. But I do want to use FB paper because that is the quality standard.
    Based on what you plan to do, you might want to consider sponge developing. All you need is a 1/4 inch thick (or thicker) piece of plexiglass larger than your print size. Using gutters, and gutter caps, make enough for each step (dev/stop/fix/etc.), about 2-3 inches wider than the plexiglass. You lean the plexi on an angle against a solid surface, sponging the chemistry on. It drips into the gutter, and can be used again. Use a separate sponge for each chemical. It's best if you have a different piece of plexi for each chemical, but you can make an extra gutter that you fill with water, so you can dip the plexi before moving to the next chemical, avoiding excessive contamination.
    I think you'll even like the creative possibilities with this system. You're able to selectively apply the chems. Years ago, I did some bleach/toning with this method. I was purposely sloppy with the applications of bleach and toner, and the results were interesting.

    Good luck with the project. I hope you show us what you come up with.

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    The wall bracket will work just as well with the 23C.

    And a standing wall will be harder to align than a horizontal surface.

    And handling large paper is a fair bit easier on a horizontal surface.


    Thank you very much. Now just to figure out how to do the wall bracket!

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by eddie View Post
    Based on what you plan to do, you might want to consider sponge developing. All you need is a 1/4 inch thick (or thicker) piece of plexiglass larger than your print size. Using gutters, and gutter caps, make enough for each step (dev/stop/fix/etc.), about 2-3 inches wider than the plexiglass. You lean the plexi on an angle against a solid surface, sponging the chemistry on. It drips into the gutter, and can be used again. Use a separate sponge for each chemical. It's best if you have a different piece of plexi for each chemical, but you can make an extra gutter that you fill with water, so you can dip the plexi before moving to the next chemical, avoiding excessive contamination.
    I think you'll even like the creative possibilities with this system. You're able to selectively apply the chems. Years ago, I did some bleach/toning with this method. I was purposely sloppy with the applications of bleach and toner, and the results were interesting.

    Good luck with the project. I hope you show us what you come up with.
    Very interesting method. Sounds a little awkward though isn't it?

  9. #29
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    It's not awkward at all. I'd recommend diluting the developer more than usual if you want to develop evenly.

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by eddie View Post
    It's not awkward at all. I'd recommend diluting the developer more than usual if you want to develop evenly.
    OK. I'm seriously considering this method then. Also, seems rather inexpensive.

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