Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,932   Posts: 1,522,193   Online: 1098
      
Page 1 of 6 123456 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 56
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    31

    Needing to enlarge up to 24x24

    I'm totally new to darkroom printing, and would like to print at about 24x24. Can anyone tell me what kind of enlarger and other equipment I would need please?? Thank you!

  2. #2
    David Brown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    near Dallas, TX USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,259
    Images
    5
    Well, an 8x10 enlarger and a room to put it in (based on your profile) ...

    However, you have really not given us enough information. What format? 8x10? Types of film and paper do you wish to use? Where are you? (makes a difference)

    Even so, this is not really something that can be answered adequately in a a forum response (In my opinion) Start by reading some of the basics:

    Darkroom design for beginners
    http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe...bs/ak3/ak3.pdf

    Making Your First Black and White Print
    http://www.ilfordphoto.com/Webfiles/...1321242292.pdf

    Ask some more specific questions and we'll try to help.
    David
    Taking pictures is easy. Making photographs is hard.

    http://www.behance.net/silverdarkroom
    http://silverdarkroom.wordpress.com

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    31
    Hi, thank you. I'm from central FL and wanting to make prints from 120mm 6x6 format.

  4. #4
    ParkerSmithPhoto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    765
    Images
    6
    Most of the large format enlargers will do 24x24 on the baseboard, and most of the medium format enlargers have reversable heads that allow you to place weights on the baseboard and then project to a lower table or the floor.

    24" prints are a real challenge for someone with considerable experience in the darkroom. For someone brand new to the dark arts, it may be overwhelming. Just getting trays that large will be expensive, not to mention paper. You'll quickly learn just how much paper goes straight from the fixer and into the trash!

    The fact is, very little of anyone's work is worth a 24" print, at least on the first go around. It's much more practical to make 11x14 prints, live with them for a while, see what sticks with you and becomes part of a larger body of work, and then make big prints.
    Parker Smith Photography, Inc.
    Atlanta, GA

    Commercial & Fine Art Photography
    Portrait Photography

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Central Florida, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,913
    If you are new to darkroom, I'd advise against going THAT big. Please realize, you will be dealing with a WET PAPER that cannot absolutely be bent, creased, bumped, poked, or otherwise do anything that will mar the surface. It starts to be challenging at around 11x14, get harder at 16x20, and absolutely a nightmare at the size you want. Fiber paper is nearly impossible without extensive experience. RC may be possible.

    Where are you in central Florida? I'm near Orlando. If you want to experience doing 16x20 RC, you can come over and you can try it yourself, if you like.

    As to enlarger, most commonly available ones will require you to "flip" the unit and project it on the floor at that size. You'll also need some GIANT trays which aren't cheap. You are literally talking about taking it outside and hosing it down to wash!
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  6. #6
    Pfiltz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    NW TN. USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    177
    I get nervous with 8x10's.... But I've only been doing it for 3 months....
    Go to the light......

    www.keepsakephotography.us

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Washington, the state
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,089
    Images
    16
    Hey, its OK to plan for the long term. Twenty-five years ago, I was where you are right now and I did some research. I thought that I might eventually like to print 16x20. I bought an enlarger that would print that big on the base board. A big easel is very expensive. Large trays are expensive. Frames can be expensive. Paper is expensive. Good luck.
    Dave

    "She's always out making pictures, She's always out making scenes.
    She's always out the window, When it comes to making Dreams.

    It's all mixed up, It's all mixed up, It's all mixed up."

    From It's All Mixed Up by The Cars

  8. #8
    Rick A's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    north central Pa
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,820
    Images
    31
    I haven't printed anything larger than 11x14 for many years. I used to send out to a custom printer anything over 16x20 as it was more cost effective for me. The space required for a DR to handle those massive prints just isn't gonna happen for me any time soon.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum
    BTW: the big kid in my avatar is my hero, my son, who proudly serves us in the Navy. "SALUTE"

  9. #9
    fotch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    SE WI- USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,062
    Its expensive, easier to do with extra large trays. I have 4 to accommodate that size. I only used them a couple of times. Normally, the largest I print would be 16x20. Good Luck.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    NW Chicagoland
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    553
    Images
    1
    This person has a single tray method for large prints: http://www.heylloyd.com/technicl/single.htm
    I've never tried it but something to think about if space and tray costs are a problem.

Page 1 of 6 123456 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin