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  1. #31

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    hello Treddy (and all)

    This my first post, and wondering what you did.I just bought the same enlarger with the same problem. were you able to repair the power supply?

    chris

  2. #32
    Ralph Javins's Avatar
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    Good morning, Treddy, and Chris up in B. C. too;

    I am impressed with the number of knowledgeable people who recognize that the Vivitar V1 Enlarger power supply is a regulated AC supply using a ferro-resonant regulating transformer. That transformer has three (3) windings where the winding with the black wires is the 120 VAC primary or input winding, the winding with the white wires is the regulated output lower voltage secondary winding, and the third or tertiary winding with the red and yellow wires is the regulating winding that works with the capacitor. The tertiary winding with the capacitor is the "resonant" part.

    Others have already commented on the necessity for getting a replacement capacitor of the same value and AC voltage rating, although the AC voltage rating can be higher, but the value of the capacitor in ufd or Micro-Farads must be the same. The exact capacitor value is important. An AC voltage rated "motor starting" capacitor of the same value will work.

    There are some other very simple ways that we can get around the death of the proprietary transformer if that has happened. One very simple way is to get a Sola type CV or CVS constant voltage transformer (there are some other brands also) with about a 90 Watt or 100 Watt rating, and replace the dead transformer and its capacitor in the power supply with just a simple low voltage transformer of about an 18 VAC at 5 Amperes rating. It may be called a "filament transformer." It will go between the black primary wires and the white secondary wires. When you plug the cable on the power supply into the external constant voltage transformer, you will move the voltage regulating function from the power supply out to the external constant voltage transformer, but the voltage lowering function stays in the power supply this way.

    Yes, there may be a slight changing of the color temperature of the light with the possibly slightly different voltage, but it can be compensated in the filter pack if truly needed. Try some test prints in color and see how it looks to see if this is necessary. With black and white it will not be truly necessary.

    Oddly enough, the V1 Enlarger is one of the very few things that Ponder and Best, or "Vivitar," actually did make in California.
    Enjoy;

    Ralph Javins, Latte Land, Washington

    When they ask you; "How many Mega Pixels you got in your camera?"
    just tell them; "I use activated silver bromide crystals tor my image storage media."

  3. #33

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    Just for the record....

    I did try adopting what I had, which is a switching power supply for laptop rated at 15 volts, 5 amps. I actually got an unexpected behavior. With this supply connected to the lamp, there was no output - most of the time. Few times, after few seconds delay, it would come on but other times, no voltage what-so-ever. If I had the lamp disconnected, the voltage would appear and I could connect the lamp and it will continue to work. When it worked, there were definitely some delay.

    From this, I suspect, some of this type of power supplies are more than just a switching regulator that there is some "intelligence" built in. Also, I suspect the start-up current of typical lamps that are significantly higher than "ON" current may also be a factor.

    Obviously, this is not suitable for this kind of use.

    I'm flying blind here but since OP said "spark" "smoke" and "capacitor showed no obvious sign of problems", I suspect the issue is either the transformer wingdings or a power switch. Oil caps usually fail catastrophically. Bulging out or oil leaking all over the place.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  4. #34
    mr rusty's Avatar
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    To Chris Fraser

    The V1 is a really good enlarger IMO. (OK I'm biased because its what I have), but whatever else, it has glassless negative carriers and absolutely cold light, so no neg popping. This plus a full range of adjustments and a very sturdy post makes for a good unit.

    Persevere in getting the light fixed/modified.

  5. #35

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    Hello Mr. Rusty

    I have used many different enlargers over the years and from the looks of this enlarger it looks great. I bought it from our local city museum (along with a Omega Prolab D6) and both enlargers are in great shape. Both came with a variety of lenses, neg carriers, development tanks, archival washer..... I couldn't pass it up.

    I am looking into having the power supply fixed, then I will decide on which to keep. Might be forced to decide on the Vivitar simply based on hieght.

    chris

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