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  1. #1

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    Zone VI cold light: VC vs. non-VC

    How do you tell the difference (other than using) between the variable contrast and non-variable contrast versions of the Zone VI cold light? I've read that the VC version admits a "blue - green" light, but I don't know if that's visible to the eye.
    "Far more critical than what we know or do not know is what we do not want to know." - Eric Hoffer

  2. #2
    NedL's Avatar
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    I have the old non-VC one and the light looks bluish-white. The blue is subtle, the main impression is bright white. I too have heard that the V54 light is more greenish or turquoise but I've never seen one. Mine does not look like the photo here:

    http://photo.net/black-and-white-pho...g-forum/00ZaL8

  3. #3

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    The photo in the photo.net post shows that blue-green coloration pretty clearly.

    There is another post in the thread that suggest the Zone VI VC head has 2 separate tubes.
    "Far more critical than what we know or do not know is what we do not want to know." - Eric Hoffer

  4. #4
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    I think I've seen a picture of one with 2 separate tubes also. Maybe a larger format enlarger ( Mine's just a beseler 23c. ) It is still possible to buy a V54 tube, but they are expensive, maybe around $150. I have a link somewhere. I'm perfectly happy with mine though, and if it ever burns out I might try to make a LED head like the recent article here on APUG.

  5. #5
    ROL
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    Page 6. 2 tubes. One green (soft), one blue (hard), on separate potentiometers.
    Last edited by ROL; 03-29-2013 at 07:52 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #6

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    Thanks. I bit ironic that instructions for a piece of photo gear would be devoid of any photos.
    "Far more critical than what we know or do not know is what we do not want to know." - Eric Hoffer

  7. #7

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    There are two versions of the Aristo VC lamp(s).
    One is a single lamp of distinctly cyanish cast usable with VC paper (I have one, it is the V54 lamp). It works well with filters, although the filter / contrast results are not as linear as with incandescent enlarger bulbs, and the exposure differences between filters do not necessarily follow the info that comes with the filters. For me it is worth it due to other advantages of cold light lamps. The bulb also works well for split filtering, and the total range of contrast is considerable, I think more than a normal incandescent bulb with VC papers. At least, I have never seen as extreme a grade 0 or 5 with any other systems, including graded paper. This version came with either a normal head, or one with a filter drawer, which is the one I have.
    The other Aristo product was a dual lamp system, and you dialed in how much of each lamp for contrast (no filters), as ROL indicates above. This arrangement required more exposure time and was more expensive for the bulb(s).

  8. #8
    NedL's Avatar
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    I'll point out also that I use split filter printing with the older "blue" cold light and am perfectly happy with it. It produces a great deal more blue light than green light, so the low contrast exposure is longer, but there is enough green available to make a very flat low contrast print.

  9. #9

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    Early Zone VI Cold Light

    Here's a photo of one I've been offered. Obviously a very early one and not the blue/green for variable contrast paper. I'm told it's for the B-66, but I can't find reference to that. I'm asked for the diameter; hoping it fits a D series.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails cold light.jpg  
    "Far more critical than what we know or do not know is what we do not want to know." - Eric Hoffer

  10. #10

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    Do not know what enlarger you have but the B-66 is for med format negs 6cm x6cm, it would be to small for a Omega D series (4x5) enlarger.

    Mike

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