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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by noacronym View Post
    You know what I'd like to hear instead of all these schemes which I'm sure I'm just as guilty of?: "I'm shooting up so much film, my developer doesn't last a week". That's what I want to hear.
    Depends on the week. I use different developers on different films, and even on the same film if shot at a different ISO. Picky yes, but sometimes developers sit around. The weather in NE Vermont can be sleet one day and full sun the next. Oh, that's today and tomorrow...

  2. #22
    AgX
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    Quote Originally Posted by MartinP View Post
    The heavier-than-air-gas preservative products work by forming a gaseous "lid" over the liquid chemical.
    That is a wrong assumption.
    By time the gases mix. The heavier-than-air concept though makes substituting air by the inert gas more easy, at its best you only need as much inert gas as air-volume to be replaced.

  3. #23
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    I would rather not bother buying gasses, spraying and all that stuff.

    In the meantime I found, thanks to tips you guys gave me, a wine preserver that insulates from oxygen:

    http://www.amazon.com/Platypus-Platy...platypreserver

    It seems that it does the trick - keeps oxygen out and it doesn't leak.

  4. #24
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    And I found this which I am sure will work just as well on developer as wine. Wine doesn't stick around long enough in our house to need preserver!

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Private-Pres...d_sim_sbs_kh_3

  5. #25

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    I use PET bottles (soda water bottles), which are pretty gas-proof and can be squeezed to exclude excess air. The ID11 stock solution that I make up keeps for at least four months at Australian temperatures (typically 20-30 degrees Centrigrade). From memory, ID11 stock solution didn't keep any longer in glass bottles.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew4x5 View Post
    I use PET bottles (soda water bottles), which are pretty gas-proof and can be squeezed to exclude excess air. The ID11 stock solution that I make up keeps for at least four months at Australian temperatures (typically 20-30 degrees Centrigrade). From memory, ID11 stock solution didn't keep any longer in glass bottles.
    Now that's very good news...I'll give it a try.

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    That is a wrong assumption.
    By time the gases mix. The heavier-than-air concept though makes substituting air by the inert gas more easy, at its best you only need as much inert gas as air-volume to be replaced.
    So the inert gas would need to totally replace the air inside the top of the container, in order to be effective? One of my colleagues is mis-using the stuff, oops. Though perhaps the diffusion of the smaller volume of inert gas takes some time (more than the time between weekends anyway)? I'll stick to marbles and squeezable bottles I think.

  8. #28
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    I tried the soda bottle concept and I did not like it.

    When you squeeze the bottle, you never manage to get all of the air out (you can verify it by turning the bottle upside down and seeing the air bubbles coming up to the bottom of the bottle).

    I also bought a bottle of Kapri Sonne (which is a folding aluminium bottle like the one on my first post) and I noticed the same phenomenon.

    So I came up with this idea: I will buy a transparent squeeze bottle with a long thin spout. I will fill it with one dose of developer (250 ml for me) and then squeeze the bottle.

    Since the bottle is transparent, I will see exactly when the liquid goes up to the top of the spout, and then cap it.

    That should keep a really minimal amount of air in the bottle and let me keep the developer for the full 6 months of the "fully stoppered bottle" described by Kodak.



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  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by MartinP View Post
    So the inert gas would need to totally replace the air inside the top of the container, in order to be effective? One of my colleagues is mis-using the stuff, oops. Though perhaps the diffusion of the smaller volume of inert gas takes some time (more than the time between weekends anyway)? I'll stick to marbles and squeezable bottles I think.
    The Argon settles to the surface of the developer because it is heavier than Oxygen. People use this in preserving paint and varnishes, and a brief spray is all that is needed. I've been using this for two years now and have had no developer go bad in an opened container.

    From the Bloxygen site:
    The heavy, inert Bloxygen gas sinks down to block oxygen from the liquid surface. Because Bloxygen is heavier than air, it will separate the liquid surface from any air that may remain in the container.

    BlOxygen has a suggested retail of $10.95 to 11.95. Each can is good for about 75 uses in quarts, 32 uses in gallons.

    Hold container lid/top closely above opening of the container to capture the gas blanket.
    Spray inside for 2 full seconds (quart size or less)
    Spray inside for 4 full seconds (gallon size or more)
    Replace lid on container immediately and capture the gas blanket. The gases now settle on the surface to prevent loss through drying and hardening.
    Each can of BLOXYGEN provides over 150 seconds of protective gas.

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by pierods View Post
    Hi,
    I think many people are against plastic squeezable containers, but these floppy bags squeeze better than accordion bottles and in any case since they hold 2/3 doses, content will not have many chances to oxidize before the container gets empty.

    Does anybody have an idea about where to buy these?
    I've had a quick whizz through the replies here, but I don't think anyone has answered your question?

    I Googled 'liquid packaging' and looked at images. That led me to 'pouch' and 'spout'. If you Google these two words you will find many manufacturers/suppliers. In the UK, for instance, there is Polypouch.

    It's a great idea. Please let us know what you end up with and whether it proves workable.

    Jonathan

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