Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,557   Posts: 1,573,244   Online: 972
      
Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 48
  1. #31

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    UK
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    78
    Images
    14
    What about this:

    http://www.daklapack.co.uk/laminated...8712963012014/

    £60.72 for 100. I'd be interested to share an order with someone if it turns out they can be easily refilled. I'll ask for a sample.

  2. #32
    pierods's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    311
    Hello Jonathan,

    I already discarded the idea of using a pouch.

    When you try to close a pouch, a fairly substantial air bubble is fatally left in the spout, no matter how close you try to level the liquid to the edge of the spout. This is due to the diameter of the spout and the fact that a liquid tends to form an arc at the surface of a spout.

    I think the solution is to have a very thin and long spout (see my post #28) on a squeezable bottle, so that when you squeeze the bottle before capping it, whatever air is left in there, say a 1 millimeter long bubble, it will still be a cylinder 1mm tall and 2 mm wide, which is a really tiny bubble.

    To empty the bottle out, one would uncap it, let air in through the spout, remove the cap and quickly pour it out.

    Please see the photo on my post #28.

  3. #33

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    UK
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    78
    Images
    14
    I'm not sure I'd be so quick to discard the idea. My main interest is just to store chemicals from one evening's printing session to the next opportunity, which might be a few days or a week later.

    OK, a thin neck will reduce the amount of oxidation, but for my purposes any bottle that's full to the neck will be fine. The worst is having a bottle that's full only to the shoulder. Glass marbles are irritating as you observed, and they have to be cleaned. I thought your pouch idea was a great way to avoid all this.

    Anyway, there's a free 1 litre sample pouch on its way to me, so I'll let you know how good it is.

  4. #34

    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Kehl/Strasbourg Germany/France
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    54
    The idea of using soft bags for the storage of developer is quite attractive. 3 and 5 liter containers are extremely cheap:
    http://www.rekru.de/index.php?cPath=Bag-in-Box-482

    On the other hand they are made of PE. And PE is relatively well permeable to oxygen. Does anybody have experience with storage of developer in PE?

    Alternative there is also the “Accordion Bottle” from Kaiser.

    http://www.kaiser-fototechnik.de/en/...ge.asp?nr=4198

    Chris

  5. #35

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Central Florida, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,026
    I really don't see the need to over-complicate this issue.... if all one want is to have developer stock solution last as long as the manufacturer says. It can be done with commonly available "Data Bottles".

    In my past experience with D-76, Dektol and XTOL, using commonly available DATA BOTTLE type plastic containers allowed me to keep the working solution for rated duration, at least. The trick is to minimize introduction and repeated introduction of fresh oxygen to the mix. When I used one 1 gallon bottle for D-76 and Dektol, last few "servings" of solutions were considerably dark and weak. Having bottle opened so many times and fresh oxygen getting in dozens of time must have done it in. I think I threw some away back then.

    What I do now is this:
    Freshly mixed stock solution gets decanted to a series of bottles.
    ONE 1/2 gallon data bottle
    ONE 1/4 gallon data bottle
    ONE or TWO 1/8 gallon data bottle (used for XTOL which comes in 5 liter bag)
    Remainder goes to up to FIVE 8 oz bottles of similar materials.

    Start using from smaller bottles. Note, each smallest bottle is "one serving" per bottle. Once all small bottles are empty, larger one get decanted into small bottles. This process continues until the largest one get decanted to remaining smaller ones.

    This way, re-introduction of oxygen is limited and number of bottles required are minimum. In my experience, they last at least 8 months. I also have an added convenience of one bottle being per serving.

    It works for me.

    By the way, there are no Data Bottles in 8 oz sizes. I use plastic bottles that are made of the same material as Data Bottles. Picking wrong type of plastic resulted in early degradation so it is important to watch for the right plastic code at bottom.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  6. #36
    pierods's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    311
    What is a data bottle?

  7. #37

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Central Florida, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,026
    http://www.adorama.com/DKBG.html

    It's called various things but it's these chemical storage bottles commonly available from Photography dealer/retailers.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  8. #38
    pierods's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    311
    Ok I see.

    Question is, I don't have the data bottles yet, so I must still make my investment in containers.

    I thought about the decanting too - but I think this can be more practical:

    My normal developer dose ("serving") is 250 ml.

    I can pour 1 gallon of d76/xtol in 7 squeeze narrow spout bottles, each one 500 ml.

    Before capping each of them, I give it a small squeeze and then cap so I get zero oxygen.

    For each use, I uncap a bottle, I pour out half of it (250 ml), give it a bigger squeeze, cap, zero oxygen again.

    Next time, I empty out the bottle, and after that I open another one.

    This way I get zero oxygen and I don't have to do the decanting.

    It remains to be seen if after the squeeze, the bottle will suck up air when capped or not.

    I'll do some tests.
    Last edited by pierods; 04-22-2013 at 02:06 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #39
    pierods's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    311
    tkamiya: do you mind telling us the code under your data bottles?

    I found these:

    http://www.ebay.de/itm/500ml-PE-Flas...item48540a3fa4

  10. #40
    pierods's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    311
    Quote Originally Posted by chrisaisenbrey View Post
    The idea of using soft bags for the storage of developer is quite attractive. 3 and 5 liter containers are extremely cheap:
    http://www.rekru.de/index.php?cPath=Bag-in-Box-482

    On the other hand they are made of PE. And PE is relatively well permeable to oxygen. Does anybody have experience with storage of developer in PE?

    Alternative there is also the “Accordion Bottle” from Kaiser.

    http://www.kaiser-fototechnik.de/en/...ge.asp?nr=4198

    Chris
    Chris,

    when the accordion bottle gets down to 250 ml, it's extremely inconvenient to squeeze, so you spill developer and let air in while doing it.

    The soft bags are attractive indeed but then you have to do the decanting.

    Also, the accordion bottles I have are all PE.
    Last edited by pierods; 04-22-2013 at 02:16 PM. Click to view previous post history.

Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin