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  1. #1

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    Why not a three-axis carpenter's laser as opposed to a Versalab?

    The title pretty much says it all. I am looking at a refurbed Bosch GPL3. Aside from aligning my D5 I have no use for this.

  2. #2

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    I foresee issues with the auto-leveling feature, but I was sort of hoping someone would chime in about that, as well.

  3. #3
    AgX
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    For those fellows as ignorant as me:

    Versalab

    http://www.versalab.com/server/photo...s/parallel.htm

  4. #4

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    My apologies. The Versalab is a laser tool specifically designed for aligning enlargers, which is what I want to do.

  5. #5

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    I'm not sure how you wanted to utilize that laser to align your enlarger, but looking at the Versalab Parallel tool, it is designed to check the alignment with very high accuracy, and the projector box appears a high precision device. Never used myself, but from instructions and given accuracy level, the Bosch GPL 3 won't even come close.

    Than again, where is the accuracy limit when it comes to enlarger alignment vs. visible difference on the print?

  6. #6

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    Pieces of glass at the negative and lens stages to reflect the laser dot dot back down upon the projecting laser emitter. The Bosch specifications seem pretty impressive (to me, what the hell do I know?) and the cost is significantly lower.
    Last edited by Jim Rice; 04-11-2013 at 11:54 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Grammer

  7. #7
    Patrick Robert James's Avatar
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    The Versalab will align the negative stage and the lens to the baseboard. The Bosch would align them to gravity if it is self leveling, which won't necessarily agree with the baseboard.

    I saw instructions once online for making an alignment tool with a laser pointer. You may be able to do it to save some dough. I have the Versalab and think it is worth the money if you are serious about print quality.

  8. #8

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    I think what I was driving at is Versalab projector box is purpose built with marked target and fine projection, with any other laser a similar box would likely be needed as the width of the laser beam (from a device like that Bosch) is quite large by comparison and accurate assessment would be nearly impossible. A good laser leveling tool for, construction work, costs hundreds of dollars, and dollars translate into a higher quality laser beam with tighter specs. Not knowing all the facts about both I still would say the savings are questionable given the overall satisfaction with Versalab performance and the rather unknown outcome of modifying a tool not originally intended to do the task.

    This is not the same as saying the Bosch cannot be used to make a useful enlarger aligner, which I'm sure it can be, but how would you test it?

    At the end of the day, making a negative of a flat test target with fine corner detail and checking the print might do. In my case, I've always been satisfied with the use of grain focuser (like Omega Peak) to check for alignment (grain is sharp around the negative regardless of its detail, so any negative can be used), as this is as far as I felt I needed to take it.

  9. #9

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    Might want to check this short thread. In the end the guy talks about his experience with Versalab.

    http://photo.net/bboard/q-and-a-fetc...HI&topic_id=23

  10. #10

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    The Versalab tool also works very well to make large enlargements by the "rotating the enlarger-head and put something heavy on the baseboard" trick.

    To get a 24", or larger, projection size (of which I'd admittedly only use 20") from my colour-head enlarger I turn the column round over the edge of the workbench. As I know the lens and carrier are aligned from normal use of the enlarger (checked with the Parallel tool), I put a sheet of chipboard on the floor, forming the temporary baseboard, with three rubber doorstoppers to support it. With the easel on the temp-baseboard and the Parallel on the easel, I can then move the angled doorstoppers in and out until the dot comes back down on itself, reflected from the glass neg-carrier (lens removed for this trick).

    It is almost as quick to do the alignment as to type the explanation. A remote-focussing extension is still needed to focus though, unless one has arms five feet long!

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