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  1. #1

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    Beseler enlarger lights?

    I purchased used Beseler enlarger model 45M recently. It come with two light housings. The light from the small one on the right is greenish in colour. The other one produces warmer light. Since this is my first contact with darkroom equipment I have no clue what these are. Is one condenser and the other one diffuser? If so which is which? Which one should I use for B&W enlargement and why?

    Thanks so much for your help.

    SloboM.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Beseler Lights.jpg  

  2. #2
    ann
    ann is offline

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    One is a standard condensor head (the larger one), the other might be a cold light head.

    They has been a long running debate about which is better, test them for yourself and use the one you prefer.

    I have used both and prefer the cold light.
    http://www.aclancyphotography.com

  3. #3

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    Thanks so much ann for your help.

    SloboM.

  4. #4
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SloboM View Post
    this is my first contact with darkroom equipment
    Good free book to read.

    http://www.scribd.com/doc/49691274/The-New-Darkroom

  5. #5

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    The small drum-shaped lamp housing is a cold light. You set the enlarger to the 5x4 lamp position to use that one for all formats. If you use variable contrast paper expect some limits on your grade range. The standard condenser head needs to be set to the right height for the format. It looks like the scale is missing on the chassis in the picture - it screws in to the right front of the lamp stage. You can get the height for smaller formats by raising the lamp, focusing the image, and repeat until the light circle is just larger than the frame. For 35mm it should be about fully extended.

    I retired my cold light a few years ago.
    I feel, therefore I photograph.

  6. #6
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    As for me, between the two, I'd use the condensor. I think old cold light setups require warmup time and correct me if I'm wrong, but cold lights are made for old graded paper that's blue/green sensitive. Also, cold lights are too dim for me. Makes focusing the neg a bit harder. But some people love it and some have shorter printing times with graded paper. It all comes down to preference.
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

  7. #7

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    ic-racer, grahamp, maincoonmaniac

    Thank you guys for your help and link. Much appreciated.

    SloboM

  8. #8
    AgX
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    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    I only see excerpts. I'm asked $9 for the pdf. (I would get it for free though if I would upload something.)

  9. #9
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    That's interesting, I did not know that Beseler made a cold light. Anyways I have an aristo cold light on my 45mx and love it, it works great. I have used the condenser too but prefer the cold light. It has been a while since I have used a condenser, and may mount it back on again soon just to see what it's like. Try them both out and see! I like the piece of mind of using a cold light as there's virtually no problems with negatives being damaged. The warm up thing is kind of a hoax, it should have 2 plugs, and one just needs to be plugged in to a constant source (not the timer) to keep it at the right temperature. It takes about 2 minutes, which is almost nothing compared the time it takes me to get my darkroom set up for printing each time.

  10. #10

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    If the cold light has a blue/green color, it might have a tube for variable contrast paper.

    (Using my new found knowledge at: http://www.apug.org/forums/forum43/1...vs-non-vc.html)
    "Far more critical than what we know or do not know is what we do not want to know." - Eric Hoffer

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