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  1. #11
    MattKing's Avatar
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    The green light is a safelight. You can get different filters for it, including an amber "OC" filter that will work with most black and white papers. I might have an extra filter or two.

    The red bulb beside it may very well be a usable safelight for black and white.

    Opaque black is what you might use to spot out clear spots on a lithographer's negative for printing.

    The Minor White book is quite interesting, and it and Minor White's other writing may be responsible for all those who wrongly (IMHO) use "previsualize" when "visualize" is more appropriate. You may find it a lot easier to follow then Ansel Adams' writing on the Zone System.

    The Kodachromide paper is a fixed contrast paper, and might be okay.

    The Polycontrast paper might also be okay.

    Both would be fun to try.

    And the enlarger is very basic, but may very well be functional. The lenses are very basic though.

    Although it was 35mm only, my first enlarger was quite similar to yours, and I got good service from it.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  2. #12
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    Questions about old stuff I just got (enlarger, cibachrime paper, etc)

    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    The green light is a safelight. You can get different filters for it, including an amber "OC" filter that will work with most black and white papers. I might have an extra filter or two.

    The red bulb beside it may very well be a usable safelight for black and white.

    Opaque black is what you might use to spot out clear spots on a lithographer's negative for printing.

    The Minor White book is quite interesting, and it and Minor White's other writing may be responsible for all those who wrongly (IMHO) use "previsualize" when "visualize" is more appropriate. You may find it a lot easier to follow then Ansel Adams' writing on the Zone System.

    The Kodachromide paper is a fixed contrast paper, and might be okay.

    The Polycontrast paper might also be okay.

    Both would be fun to try.

    And the enlarger is very basic, but may very well be functional. The lenses are very basic though.

    Although it was 35mm only, my first enlarger was quite similar to yours, and I got good service from it.
    Does very basic mean poor quality with blurry images? Lol

    And yea I sort if already use my eye to spot the right place to meter which seems to match the exposure info in both books, though the ansel book talks of orthochromatic films

    What does "OC" mean?

    So I can chuck the opaque black?

    Yes, I thought the PRE was a little strange :/ lol

    I wonder if I should start with them? Or should I start with something new and then play with them when I actually know what I'm doing?


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  3. #13
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Basic means not fancy. If you put the enlarger together and it is sturdy and straight and each part that is supposed to be level and parallel to the other parts is level and parallel, and if the light shines evenly where it is supposed to shine, and if it is easy to adjust the height and the focus and the height and the focus stay where you set them, then the enlarger is capable of good prints.

    And as for the lenses, assuming they haven't be damaged, and that they are clean, they will most likely do fine with reasonably sized enlargements. 8 x 10 should be fine, and 11 x 14 may be as well.

    OC refers to the Kodak safelight codes - OC is the most useful. You will see reference to other codes as well, like OA. Here is a reference: http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe...845/ti0845.pdf

    If you have somebody to show you the ropes, you can probably experiment with the paper. Otherwise, I would recommend starting with a fairly large package of 5x7 paper.

    And as for the Kodak Opaque? It can be used for retouching negatives, so I would suggest you keep it.

    Negative retouching is excellent for building the capacity for quiet patience.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  4. #14
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Questions about old stuff I just got (enlarger, cibachrime paper, etc)

    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Basic means not fancy. If you put the enlarger together and it is sturdy and straight and each part that is supposed to be level and parallel to the other parts is level and parallel, and if the light shines evenly where it is supposed to shine, and if it is easy to adjust the height and the focus and the height and the focus stay where you set them, then the enlarger is capable of good prints.

    And as for the lenses, assuming they haven't be damaged, and that they are clean, they will most likely do fine with reasonably sized enlargements. 8 x 10 should be fine, and 11 x 14 may be as well.

    OC refers to the Kodak safelight codes - OC is the most useful. You will see reference to other codes as well, like OA. Here is a reference: http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe...845/ti0845.pdf

    If you have somebody to show you the ropes, you can probably experiment with the paper. Otherwise, I would recommend starting with a fairly large package of 5x7 paper.

    And as for the Kodak Opaque? It can be used for retouching negatives, so I would suggest you keep it.

    Negative retouching is excellent for building the capacity for quiet patience.
    Ok, thanks, this should be interesting... I may start with a few contact prints first just to get an idea of the paper development process.

    Also, did I ask? Why would I use the paper developer tank instead of developing trays?


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  5. #15
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    Ok, thanks, this should be interesting... I may start with a few contact prints first just to get an idea of the paper development process.

    Also, did I ask? Why would I use the paper developer tank instead of developing trays?


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    Two reasons:

    1) If you print colour, you need to work in total darkness. The developing tube is light tight, but permits you to fill and empty the chemicals without opening it. This allows you to load the paper in the dark, and then do the developing with the lights on; and
    2) It is easier to do a couple of quick prints with the tube, because it isn't necessary to set up and take down as much stuff. It is a bit of a pain though to do much more than a print or two, because you need to thoroughly rinse and dry the tube before each print. I solve that problem (when I am using the tubes) by having a number of them, plus space to air dry them between rounds.

    If you use the tubes, you lose the chance to watch the print appearing in front of you. It isn't quite as magical as tray development.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  6. #16
    Jerevan's Avatar
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    Something about that enlarger reminds me a lot about the small Fujimoto we had in our shared darkroom a few years back. I would not be surprised if it wasn't a re-branded thing. If it is a re-brand, then the Fujimoto G70 neg holders fit this one. There is some sort of connection to the chinese-made "Lucky" enlargers (I think they might have taken over the production) but I can't remember exactly what, before coffee-time in the morning.
    “Do your work, then step back. The only path to serenity.” - Lao Tzu

  7. #17
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Questions about old stuff I just got (enlarger, cibachrime paper, etc)

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerevan View Post
    Something about that enlarger reminds me a lot about the small Fujimoto we had in our shared darkroom a few years back. I would not be surprised if it wasn't a re-branded thing. If it is a re-brand, then the Fujimoto G70 neg holders fit this one. There is some sort of connection to the chinese-made "Lucky" enlargers (I think they might have taken over the production) but I can't remember exactly what, before coffee-time in the morning.
    Ok I'll take a pic of them, but are you saying you have a 6x7?


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  8. #18

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    Stone, Sorry, but I think the old Cibachrome is worthless. Ilfochrome, its replacement is very different including the chemistry. Don

  9. #19
    polyglot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    1) If you print colour, you need to work in total darkness. The developing tube is light tight, but permits you to fill and empty the chemicals without opening it. This allows you to load the paper in the dark, and then do the developing with the lights on; and
    Yep. I do all my printing (including RA4) in (Jobo) drums. RA4 developer is pretty stinky and people tend to be come badly sensitised to it; drum processing avoids all that because there's none out in an open tray. Not to mention you don't need to try getting a print into and between trays while blind. And a drum takes up MUCH less darkroom space than a row of trays, especially when you do larger prints: think about how big a row of three 20x24 trays is going to be and that doesn't even include washing!

    Google for "unicolor roller" as that's what you have. You can get a motorised base to run it on and not wear your arms out.

    2) It is easier to do a couple of quick prints with the tube, because it isn't necessary to set up and take down as much stuff. It is a bit of a pain though to do much more than a print or two, because you need to thoroughly rinse and dry the tube before each print. I solve that problem (when I am using the tubes) by having a number of them, plus space to air dry them between rounds.
    Nope. Tube can be wet when you put the next piece of paper in there, just give the paper a 20s pre-wet so that it's ALL wet, not just the bits that got dripped on. Keep in mind also that tube processing will oxidise developer so it will not last very long, but you need very little compared to trays. I use 100mL at a time of Multigrade 1+10 (I think 60mL is enough for some 8x10 drums) and run it through the tube 3 or 4 times before discarding. Even if you use 1L at a time, it'll still only last maybe 10 processes before it dies because it's not the paper that's exhausting it.

    Your enlarger really is only good for 6x6 (but it will make perfectly good 8x8", maybe 12x12" B&W prints with that 4-element lens); neither the lens nor the condensers will cover 6x7 properly. Good 6x7 enlargers are pretty easy to find though, usually for $0 to $50, maybe $50 to $100 with a good 6-element lens (Componon-S, Rodagon, EL-Nikkor); you want 80mm for 6x7. You will want a dichroic (colour) diffusion enlarger if you ever want to print in colour, easily recognisable by the presence of cyan/magenta/yellow knobs. And they're (IMHO) easier to use for B&W printing than a condenser enlarger with separate contrast filters.

    My FAQ has a printing howto that will probably answer a bunch of your next questions, or better yet, get a copy of Way Beyond Monochrome. More modern than The Negative, plus it covers the stuff in The Print too.

  10. #20
    richard ide's Avatar
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    Keep the black negative opaque. When you have the money buy a Winsor Newton series 7 sable watercolour brush size 00 from an art store. Another brand would work but these are the best and well worth the money; about $14. When you have clear spots on a negative or scratches, Use the opaque to cover the spot. A white spot on a print is easier to disguise with Spotone than a black one. The brush will also be the best for print spotting. Use it with respect and care and it will last you many years.
    Richard

    Why are there no speaker jacks on a stereo camera?

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