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  1. #21
    tony lockerbie's Avatar
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    Not better than tray developing, just uses a lot less (expensive) chemicals and is easier to control the temperature with a water bath for colour processes. Ditch the Cibachrome as the chems are no longer available and the paper will be dead anyway, ditto the B&W paper.
    Even if you file out the neg carrier, the condenser won't have enough coverage for 6x7. You will need a 6x7 enlarger or buy a Rollei
    The enlarger should work ok, and the 50mm will be passable, but the 75 will most likely be cr#p.
    Don't be put off though, as darkroom work is very addictive, you just need three trays and if you have a 35mm camera try that out with the enlarger...or shoot some 6x7's that can be cropped to 6x6.

  2. #22
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Questions about old stuff I just got (enlarger, cibachrime paper, etc)

    Quote Originally Posted by richard ide View Post
    Keep the black negative opaque. When you have the money buy a Winsor Newton series 7 sable watercolour brush size 00 from an art store. Another brand would work but these are the best and well worth the money; about $14. When you have clear spots on a negative or scratches, Use the opaque to cover the spot. A white spot on a print is easier to disguise with Spotone than a black one. The brush will also be the best for print spotting. Use it with respect and care and it will last you many years.
    OH!!!! Somehow I missed the idea that you could use it on the print, I was thinking negative only and I don't shoot LF yet and no way I'm spotting small format negs if I can help it haha

    Also Matt somehow I missed your comment above, thanks totally makes sense now.

    Also I do have a pack of unicolor filters which include all the colors for color printing as the previous owner was printing chromes.

    Hmm Cibichrome uses different chemistry than ilfochrome?

    Is the old stuff in existence in any form? Can I use the paper for ANYTHING?


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  3. #23
    AgX
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    Cibachrome and Ilfochrome are basically different trade names for the same materials.

    The name change is due to the Ciba company retrating from the business.

  4. #24
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Questions about old stuff I just got (enlarger, cibachrime paper, etc)

    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    Cibachrome and Ilfochrome are basically different trade names for the same materials.

    The name change is due to the Ciba company retrating from the business.
    Then why did that other guy say it was different? Lol


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  5. #25
    AgX
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    Because he mixed up things.

    ILFOCHROME CLASSIC is the new name for the well known CIBACHROME positive to positive color printing materials. There is no difference in quality or processing between either product.
    source: Ilford 1997



    However Ilford back then offered fast access Ilfochrome Rapid materials, which were different.
    Last edited by AgX; 04-17-2013 at 07:39 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #26
    Rick A's Avatar
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    Stone, if you ever feel like doing a road trip, I have a Beseler 23cII you can have for free. I only have a 35mm carrier for it but all other size carriers and lenses can be had cheap.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum

  7. #27
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Questions about old stuff I just got (enlarger, cibachrime paper, etc)

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick A View Post
    Stone, if you ever feel like doing a road trip, I have a Beseler 23cII you can have for free. I only have a 35mm carrier for it but all other size carriers and lenses can be had cheap.
    Cool, does that do 6x7 and 4x5?

    I'm totally unaware of enlargers...


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  8. #28

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    That copy of The Negative looks really old. I'd get the most updated editions of the Ansel books. They are soft cover and not very expensive

  9. #29
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    The Beseler 23C will do up to 6x9cm negatives. If you wanted to go into an orgy of customization, you probably could build a lamphouse for it that would illuminate 4x5, but it would not be cost-effective. But the 23C is a terrific enlarger (I have a spare one sitting around as well) and I would be using it were it not for the fact that I do mostly large format work now and I have a Beseler 45M-series (I forget which one it is, MCRX? MC? blue chassis). The 23C is very rigid and solid. You can flip the head 90 degrees to project on a wall if you want to print really big. The 23C and the Omega D-series enlargers were the mainstays of school darkrooms for decades, for a very good reason - they're well nigh indestructible. Do check the elevation mechanism on any one you look at to make sure it is smooth and doesn't slip when stopped. Also check that the negative stage and baseboard can be made parallel - bring a little level with you and first check the level of the surface on which the enarger rests. Then compare that to the baseboard, and the negative stage. If the baseboard is warped, it isn't the end of the world - that can be remedied by a trip to Home Depot to get some good 1/4" plywood. If the negative stage is bent, walk away from it. It is possible that it can be fixed, but it is not cost-effective.
    Last edited by TheFlyingCamera; 04-17-2013 at 10:58 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #30
    Fixcinater's Avatar
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    I have a Vivitar E34 enlarger that looks just like that one shown here, it's very serviceable. You should be able to find another lens for it here quite inexpensively. I have a couple Nikkors for mine and it does just fine for 35mm and 6x6.

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