Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,556   Posts: 1,545,121   Online: 1070
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 18 of 18
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    133
    After having studied the Ilford paperwork (repeated below), The Company sure doesn't show a lot of enthusiasm for using colorheads to replace filters. I guess I have to agree with them. Still, the biggest part of me tells me I need to pay attention to getting the negative right in the first place. Conventionally, the idea is to use grade 2 for everything. I'm going to tinker with this to at least get a good grade 2 on the colorhead, just to cut out reaching for a filter, flipping through the little tabbed filebook every blasted time. That gets old And since #2 will spend the most time out of the protective file, it'll be the first one that gets ruined. Then the whole book is no good. It's an extra step I could do without
    Last edited by HTF III; 04-19-2013 at 07:40 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #12
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,394
    Images
    60
    FWIW, I rarely used the specific grade "equivalents" when I switched from discrete, under the lens filters to using a colour head on my Beseler 67.

    The chart referred to on Ilford's site helps you at first, because it gives you a feel for how much adjustment is needed to make a meaningful change, but the speed matching is usually of marginal value, because it is dependent on matching a particular mid-tone, and the mid-tone I want to match varies from negative to negative.

    The great advantage of the dichroic head is, IMHO, its ability to supply an almost infinite variety of fine adjustments to contrast.

    I'd suggest to the OP that he/she start with the suggested setting for grade "2" from the Ilford technical publication (using the Beseler/Kodak numbers) and a negative of known "average" contrast. And then tweak from there, if necessary.

    EDIT: Just to make sure that we are talking about the same thing, this is one of the publications I am referring to: http://www.ilfordphoto.com/download....8932591755.pdf

    The paper also includes a slip with the same information.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    133
    Thank you Matt. I neglected the link in my last post, which is the same Ilford publication. At this moment and for the next few nights I am making my tests. Some with negatives, some with a 21 step Stouffers. This post is just an aside in the meantime to ponder that the price of the 67 Dichro bulb is something to consider in this attempt to switch from the standard Beseler 67C head to the color head. I wonder how long these dichro head bulbs last and if they can take thermal shock well from repeated on-off cycling like this. For instance, flip a slide or movie projector on and off a few times and you'll blow the bulb. I wonder if these dichro bulbs can take the punishment. At any rate, maybe I'd better order a spare or 2. Setting up the kitchen to do darkroom and then having a dead bulb would be annoying.

  4. #14
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,394
    Images
    60
    I found that if I used the internet sources for the bulbs the price went down significantly.

    I never had to replace my bulb, after I bought a couple of backups (naturally). I would think though that, even though I had my enlarger on a moveable cart, the bulb would be less subject to physical shock then bulbs in slide and movie projectors. And I think that physical shock is a way more important factor than thermal shock when it comes to use in an enlarger.

    My Beseler 67 is currently in storage - I switched to an Omega D6 with an Ilford Multigrade head when one came available on local Craigslist. I would prefer, however, to have both installed in a full time darkroom, because there are real advantages to each enlarger.

    EDIT: See below for a photo of my Beseler 67 with the colour head "in action" in my bathroom/temporary darkroom. Now just imagine how much larger the Omega D6 is!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Beseler67.JPG  
    Last edited by MattKing; 04-19-2013 at 11:03 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  5. #15
    Muihlinn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Olías del Rey, Toledo
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    281
    Quote Originally Posted by HTF III View Post
    Setting up the kitchen to do darkroom and then having a dead bulb would be annoying.
    Having used almost every light source I don't find dichroic bulbs in the enlarger particularly weak, in my experience they last about the same than home ones. Also, I've used color head filtration and over the lens, also under the lens filters. No differences whatsoever except for the 4 1/2 - 5 grades which looks more hard with filters.
    Luis Miguel Castañeda Navas
    http://imaginarymagnitude.net/

  6. #16

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Daventry, Northamptonshire, England
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    6,965
    Id suggest that the OP has a look at Ralph Lambrecht's Darkroom Magic site as well. Ralph very kindly makes available his research into dual filtration and balancing exposure. It is the case that the Ilford dual filtration figures differ slightly from Ralph's own if I recall correctly but more importantly Ralph gives fstop corrections( in fractions of fstops) needed to achieve balance as the dual filtration numbers fail to achieve exact balance by themselves although the differences over say grades 2.5 to 3 are fairly small.

    Of course the whole thing is easier if you have an fstop timer such as the Nocon, RH Designs or Darkroom Automation but it can be done with a timer working in secs and tenths with the aid of Ralph's table. Also available at Darkroom Magic

    pentaxuser

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    928
    I'm probably foolish and slapdash, but who cares what grade-equivalent the colour filtration is? Just make a note and use the same next time you print the neg on that enlarger. If you use a different enlarger, then print up some standard negative on both systems and see how much to "aim off". Alternatively make two (differing) exposures - one each with max yellow and max magenta. If there is too much light for practical exposure manipulations, consider putting an old Cokin filter holder on the enlarger lens, with a neutral density filter in there.

    The flimsy multicontrast filter sheets are intended for use in filter drawers and there is a more solid version made for under lens use. With these filters, the harder grades do seem harder than using magenta filtration, on my colour-head enlarger at least, but Grade-5 is rarely necessary.

    You might find that a notional Grade-2 equivalent is a bit soft for an average neg, if you developed them for a condenser enlarger originally, but you can always bump up the magenta a bit.

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    SF Bay Area, California, US
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    276
    HTF
    Get a spare bulb.
    I always have a spare bulb on hand. This is especially important today, where there are less and less local cameras shops to drive to and get a new bub.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin