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  1. #1
    AgX
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    DIY dipping processor

    A dutch fellow member (jamonadap) built this machine:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=cvgAQ-t0mX4

  2. #2
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    Very Cool! So, it looks like their is some bugs to iron out with agitation, which I am sure can be reasonably easily fixed.

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    Very interesting. Thanks for sharing this! ---john.

  4. #4
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    Very cool!

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    Waaayyyyy too slow. My frustration with using the Paterson tanks at the "kitchen table" (ie daylight) is you have to pour chemicals in and out of the tank. So when you are timing your development when is the "start" of the development? When you start pouring in the developer or when the last drop of the developer goes into the tank. This process can take several seconds. Dumping out is a bit faster because you don't have to use care. Then the next thing is adding the stop. You really want all developing to stop at the same time on the negative. This simply is not possible because again it takes a few seconds to pour in the stop.

    Developing in the darkroom with steel reels and multiple tanks seems ideal. You just quickly drop the film in the tank and developing begins everywhere almost simultaneously. That system seems nice once you have done the stop. I personally wash my film using the fill, soak, dump and refill routine instead of continuous water flow. It would be nice if there was a system that dumped the water and refilled it at different progressively longer intervals. I never have problems with pink/purple negatives even with tabular films like some people. If you soak them long enough in multiple water baths the dyes eventually rinse out... a tedious process though.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noble View Post
    Waaayyyyy too slow. My frustration with using the Paterson tanks at the "kitchen table" (ie daylight) is you have to pour chemicals in and out of the tank. So when you are timing your development when is the "start" of the development? When you start pouring in the developer or when the last drop of the developer goes into the tank. This process can take several seconds. Dumping out is a bit faster because you don't have to use care. Then the next thing is adding the stop. You really want all developing to stop at the same time on the negative. This simply is not possible because again it takes a few seconds to pour in the stop.

    Developing in the darkroom with steel reels and multiple tanks seems ideal. You just quickly drop the film in the tank and developing begins everywhere almost simultaneously. That system seems nice once you have done the stop. I personally wash my film using the fill, soak, dump and refill routine instead of continuous water flow. It would be nice if there was a system that dumped the water and refilled it at different progressively longer intervals. I never have problems with pink/purple negatives even with tabular films like some people. If you soak them long enough in multiple water baths the dyes eventually rinse out... a tedious process though.
    Way too slow maybe, but this can be dealt with and tuned. Once the process is sorted, it should be a very consistent approach.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Noble View Post
    So when you are timing your development when is the "start" of the development? When you start pouring in the developer or when the last drop of the developer goes into the tank. This process can take several seconds.
    I teach film developing and get people asking this once in a while. My answer is that film development times can be broken into discrete chunks of either 10 seconds or 15 seconds. If you need to time development down to the second, or can tell the difference between development of one second and the next one, then you are probably not using a daylight tank in the first place. --- While you are stressing over seconds, the rest of the class is done, has good looking film, and is moving onto the next step.
    * Just because your eyes are closed, doesn't mean the lights in the darkroom are off. *
    * When the film you put in the camera is worth more than the camera you put the film in... *
    * When I started using 8x10, it amazed me how many shots were close to the car. *

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Searust View Post
    I teach film developing and get people asking this once in a while. My answer is that film development times can be broken into discrete chunks of either 10 seconds or 15 seconds. If you need to time development down to the second, or can tell the difference between development of one second and the next one, then you are probably not using a daylight tank in the first place. --- While you are stressing over seconds, the rest of the class is done, has good looking film, and is moving onto the next step.
    Wouldn't "stressing" about it make you proceed thorough the fluid changes faster? That too me would seem the logical solution not going slower.

    I shoot TMAX 100 @ ISO 50 and develop in XTOL. The Kodak datasheet recommends 30 seconds less developing versus shooting at ISO 100. I haven't had a lot of time to experiment because I had other issues that were more pressing. I was just thinking 5 seconds is 16% of of 30. When you look at it that way that's a lot of slop. I wasn't sure whether it made a difference in the final print. I didn't really "stress" about it but it is something a logical person would think about. I have traced 90% of my issues in developing to deviating from the manufacture's recommendations. I overly complicated my efforts by being sloppy. Anyway I haven't done any experiments and if you say it is irrelevant then that is good enough for me for now.

    My biggest problems with developing were uneven developing (particularly in smooth skies) and air bells. Adding an acid stop bath helped with some of the uneven development but the type of swift fluid changes and vigorous thump to reliably dislodge bubbles one needs leads me to believe you would need a machine that is a lot more robust. The overall concept seems sound, but the materials don't seem like the could stand up to the necessary level of violence. Having said that I would welcome anything that took that chore off my hands and resulted in nice negatives.

  9. #9

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    "When you start pouring in the developer or when the last drop of the developer goes into the tank."

    When all of the developer is poured in, and you have slamed your bubbles out. Start the timer and then start your initial constant agitation.

    That will help ensure even development. Avoiding processing times less than 5 minutes will also aid. If I can't hit the 5 minute mark with my film / developer combintation, I go with a different dilution, or I use a different developer.

  10. #10

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    Thanks for all contributions!

    As I write in the video, it is a showoff of the first tryout. A lot is to say about speed and so on. For me count at this moment this procedure shows some potential.....and I will continu it with more tryouts like change in speed, change in agitation and more diffrences in concentration of the liquids. I promise to report later!

    with mind regards,

    Jan

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