Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,826   Posts: 1,582,046   Online: 765
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 19 of 19
  1. #11
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    13,819
    Quote Originally Posted by clayne View Post
    The defrost cycle is not really as big a concern as people make it out to be.
    I agree.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    16,878
    Images
    23
    don't waste your time with chemistry in the fridge.
    you can easily make a water jacket ( a tray with cold or hot water in it to raise the temp of your chemistry )
    a chest freezer is good, greybeard speaks wisdom

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    34
    Many upright freezers are frost-free. Most chest freezers are manual defrost. Self-defrosting models circulate air through a box where a refrigeration evaporator is mounted. The frost builds up on the fins of the evaporator and this is melted off by heating the box with a small electric heating element, usually every 12 hours, while the refrigeration compressor is not running. Only the evaporator is heated, not the contents of the interior.

    However, most chest freezers have coils of refrigeration tubing routed all over the interior surface of the food box. The only provision to defrost these is a drain plug in the bottom. You turn them off for a day and let the ice melt. If you are in a humid environment and you open one of these freezers often, you'll be removing the contents and manually defrosting every few months. What would be really sad is if you had an extended power outage while away and came back to find photo materials soaked to the bone then frozen in a solid block when the power came back on. That exact scenario happened to the father in law during Sandy recently and ruined a grand in paper - most not replaceable since Kodak discontinued those lines.

  4. #14
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    13,819
    Quote Originally Posted by Clovis Blevins View Post
    Many upright freezers are frost-free. Most chest freezers are manual defrost. Self-defrosting models circulate air through a box where a refrigeration evaporator is mounted. The frost builds up on the fins of the evaporator and this is melted off by heating the box with a small electric heating element, usually every 12 hours, while the refrigeration compressor is not running. Only the evaporator is heated, not the contents of the interior.

    However, most chest freezers have coils of refrigeration tubing routed all over the interior surface of the food box. The only provision to defrost these is a drain plug in the bottom. You turn them off for a day and let the ice melt. If you are in a humid environment and you open one of these freezers often, you'll be removing the contents and manually defrosting every few months. What would be really sad is if you had an extended power outage while away and came back to find photo materials soaked to the bone then frozen in a solid block when the power came back on. That exact scenario happened to the father in law during Sandy recently and ruined a grand in paper - most not replaceable since Kodak discontinued those lines.
    That is why I have a frost free refrigerator freezer in which I keep the film and paper.

    Do not bother with the chemicals in the refrigerator. But do keep the chemical bottles in a bucket or pan because at some time the choose to leak.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Southern USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,126
    Do NOT store solutions in the frig. This can cause various chemicals to crystalize out. When this happens they can be very difficult to put back in solution. I repeat no solutions in the frig.

    In the frig film should be stored at 0C to 4C. This is the usual temperature recommended for food storage. For more permanent storage film should be stored in a freezer at -10C. Get a refrigerator thermometer to check temperatures.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  6. #16
    Trask's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    1,148
    Images
    10
    I bought an upright freezer, a small one, from Sears last year, and store film in it. My main kitchen fridge/freezer has the freezer on the bottom, where you have to bend over and pull frozen items in and out to uncover what you want, so I appreciate the fact that in my film freezer I have four or five shelves that make it much easier to find what I want. I've triaged my film according to size (35mm, 120, 220), color or B/W, or bulk rolls, and keep it all in quality freezer bags. So I can pull out a bag and quickly find the Agfa 50 slide film or a roll of APX100. I do have a bit of frost on the shelves, but I've not yet had to defrost the unit.

  7. #17
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Vic., Australia.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,682
    Images
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    I agree.

    I do too.
    “The photographer must determine how he wants the finished print to look before he exposes the negative.
    Before releasing the shutter, he must seek 'the flame of recognition,' a sense that the picture would reveal
    the greater mystery of things...more clearly than the eyes see."
    ~Edward Weston, 1922.

  8. #18
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Misissauaga Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,939
    Images
    29
    I have an upright freezer in my garage, almost stuffed with film and paper. I say almost, because I keep the bottom drawer for longer term storage food items, like summer picked berries, etc.

    If the power fails in this sort of freezer, any frost accumulation on the shelves, where the chiller pipe sections are, will melt, lightly wetting the stuff on the shlef below it, and then will gradually migrate to the bottom of the freezer, where my plastic bags of food will see the outside wetted.

    I have a pal with a chest freezer where the power got pulled accidentlally over one weekend, and noticed mid week. I just bought the last of his stocks, since he has stepped to the dark side. All of the packages were stacked veritcally, and all smell of off beef juices. Fortunately I had enough spare empty paper envelopes and boxes to toss all of the fouled outer paper packaging.

    Power wise, I am mid way though a study of where the power we consumes goes in our house. I now know that my upright freezer takes 1.3 kWh per day when the door is not openned.
    That is over some of the hottest weather we typically see in the summer that we experienced last week.
    I typically only open the door once every few weeks, usually in the winter. Too much to do in the summer to pull paper to print all the time .

    Where I live, for a good part of the winter the compressor does not run much at all, becuase the garage is typically a few degrees below freezing between mid December and mid March. .
    my real name, imagine that.

  9. #19
    clayne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    San Francisco, CA | Kuching, MY | Jakarta, ID
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,838
    Images
    57
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Wilde View Post
    All of the packages were stacked veritcally, and all smell of off beef juices. Fortunately I had enough spare empty paper envelopes and boxes to toss all of the fouled outer paper packaging.
    I take it you got a great deal on his stocks of Kodak Tri-Tip 400 though?

    (don't hurt me guys, its Friday)
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin