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  1. #1

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    Fridge/Freeze Guidance

    Looking for a small refrigerator/freezer (I think). I want to keep both chemistry and film as fresh as possible. Looking for a garage unit that' not to big. Any specific guidance?
    Last edited by nbagno; 06-26-2013 at 01:09 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #2

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    There are "apartment" size fridges, they are smaller than the standard home fridge.
    But you have to hunt for them.

  3. #3
    MattKing's Avatar
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    If you intend to keep large printing paper in the refrigerator or freezer, it is important to have the dimensions of the boxes in mind when you evaluate the internal dimensions of the units you are considering.

    So called "frost free" units bring rise to some concerns, as they use warming cycles to deal with the frost.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  4. #4
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    Garage? Use a chest freezer of whatever size you prefer. You'll have it filled in a week.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  5. #5
    Rick A's Avatar
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    I have a 14 cubic foot chest freezer in my basement filled with film and paper.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum

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    I won't have any paper to keep, just color/b&w chemicals and film. So film in the freezer chemicals in the fridge right? Good point about the defrost feature, just the reason I asked this question. Sound's like I should just get a normal freezer/fridge, they are cheap enough on craigs list.

  7. #7

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    It is my understanding that liquid chemicals should NOT be kept in an refrigerator as component may separate out.... I don't know about powdered ones.

    Personally, I keep film and paper in fridge but not chemicals - liquid or powder.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  8. #8
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    If you are planning to stockpile film or paper and hold it for years, you want a freezer (chest type, because they tend to be more efficient and over time the electricity cost adds up). If you just want to make sure that your stock doesn't degrade before you can use it, a refrigerator is fine, and you will not have to plan so far ahead when you want to bring something out and use it.

    From experience, I would recommend sealing anything intended for freezer storage in an airtight package. Not that the air is an issue, but when the inevitable freezer failure, power loss, or accidental-door-left-ajar event comes along, melting frost and condensation will be kept away from the material. For anything that will fit, a vacuum/heat seal food packaging appliance is great. (I still haven't found a really good solution for 11x14 film and paper boxes, so maybe an industrial-size bag sealer is something to consider.)

    Regarding chemicals (b/w only, in my case) I have never had a problem with degradation that wasn't connected to air exposure. The backyard darkroom gets into the Fahrenheit mid-90s on hot days, but I have to keep it warm during the winter lest I go out to work and find crystals in the bottoms of the Dektol and fixer bottles.

  9. #9
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nbagno View Post
    So film in the freezer chemicals in the fridge right?
    Yes
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  10. #10
    clayne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nbagno View Post
    I won't have any paper to keep, just color/b&w chemicals and film. So film in the freezer chemicals in the fridge right? Good point about the defrost feature, just the reason I asked this question. Sound's like I should just get a normal freezer/fridge, they are cheap enough on craigs list.
    Nope, get a chest freezer - like the kind your parents may have stored meat in. The defrost cycle is not really as big a concern as people make it out to be.

    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya
    Personally, I keep film and paper in fridge but not chemicals - liquid or powder.
    I also keep chemicals outside of the freezer or fridge, but powders should be fine frozen. There's no water involved and they're already solid, so I can't really see how freezing would harm the chemical makeup of things. That being said, most powders are nitrogen sealed from the factory and aren't really going to do much on their own unfrozen as it is.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

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