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  1. #11
    artonpaper's Avatar
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    I have a stirrer with a heater. It works great for most things. I got extra magnets and a wand for retrieving them from the graduate from Edmund Scientific. The only thing it doesn't do well is stir and dissolve ferric oxalate. Heating it to around 150º and putting a top on the bottle and shaking the heck out it for about 20 minutes is the only thing that works for me.

  2. #12
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Can someone tell me what this is used for? Like, why is it magnetic? And what's it for? I've never had to "stir" before I just pour the chemicals in water, close the container, rotate it a few times and the working solution is ready to go... So ... I don't get it....


    ~Stone | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
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  3. #13
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    It's used for mixing solids into liquids, or liquids into liquids.

    It's magnetic because the mixing is accomplished by placing the container to be mixed on top of a plate that covers a rotating magnet. A small magnetic mixing bar is then dropped into the container. When the mixer is activated the bar is twirled by the rotating magnet below the plate, thus mixing the container's contents.

    Fancier mixers also include a heating element below the plate so one can simultaneously heat and mix solutions. Many dry chemicals dissolve quicker and easier in warmer water.

    Ken
    "Hate is an adolescent term used to stop discussion with people you disagree with. You can do better than that."
    —'blanksy', December 13, 2013

  4. #14
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Nadvornick View Post
    It's used for mixing solids into liquids, or liquids into liquids.

    It's magnetic because the mixing is accomplished by placing the container to be mixed on top of a plate that covers a rotating magnet. A small magnetic mixing bar is then dropped into the container. When the mixer is activated the bar is twirled by the rotating magnet below the plate, thus mixing the container's contents.

    Fancier mixers also include a heating element below the plate so one can simultaneously heat and mix solutions. Many dry chemicals dissolve quicker and easier in warmer water.

    Ken
    Oh, I've never had anything that needed a stirrer, but just bought my first bulk chemistry for mixing my own so maybe I'll have to get one...


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    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  5. #15
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
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    I don't recall the model number - it is years old and was bought for a good price used. Basic variac for speed control. You need to manually adjust the speed depending on if you have dumped in too much dry chemistry at once so the stirrier bogs down. Too fast, and it whips air into the solution, which is a nono for developers.

    I added a heater salvaged from Bunn commercial coffee warmer to the underside of the stirring platform. It works best to hold temperatures, rather than actually heating the solution in any reasonable rate. Usually I mix in a 3.8L stainless steel beaker, or a 2L pyrex beaker or erlenmeyer flask if the solution needs to stay hot and mix for a long time.
    my real name, imagine that.

  6. #16
    Jim Noel's Avatar
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    I would hate to be without a heated one.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    Oh, I've never had anything that needed a stirrer, but just bought my first bulk chemistry for mixing my own so maybe I'll have to get one...


    ~Stone | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    Just keep in mind in case you don't feel like spending extra $ on a stirrer, it is a convenience, not a necessity. Most if not all the dry chemicals you'll be mixing will dissolve fine stirring by hand. I've never had a magnetic stirrer, although maybe one day I'll get one just for the hell of it.

  8. #18

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    I have gotten a lot of good information here. I have another question. I plan on using a 1000ml and 2000ml glass beakers to mix my chemistry. What size mixing bar works best relative to size and shape?

  9. #19

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    Hey guys, just saw this. I've never used one for mixing photography or lab chemicals, but magnetic stirrers are a big thing in Homebrewing for making yeast starters. Basically, the stirrer constantly aerates the yeast starter so you have a large initial pitch into the unfermented beer.


    There are a lot people who have started making magnetic stirrers because the lab grade ones are either too expensive or too hard to find for the average homebrewer. Most that I know of are not heated. If you are looking for a good (cheap) stirrer homebrew yeast stirrers are a great place to start.

    I have one from Stir Starters. It works great for my purposes. I use a 2000mL erlenmeyer flask for making starters with this device. I think he also has instructions on a DIY version on the website as well.

  10. #20

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    I'm not sure how specifically a yeast stirrer differs from a lab stirrer in design, but aeration is definitely NOT what you want when mixing photochemistry.

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