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  1. #11
    msage's Avatar
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    About 5 years ago I worked in a lab that had a gas tankless water heater and we had nothing but problems maintaining 70 degrees for B&W processing. When I built my darkroom I put in a 19 gal electric hot water heater in and has worked well. The only thing I would do different is a bigger one (40 gal).
    Michael

    "I only wanted Uncle Vern standing by his new car (a Hudson) on a clear day. I got him and the car. I also got a bit of Aunt Mary's laundry, and Beau Jack, the dog, peeing on a fence, and a row of potted tuberous begonias on the porch and 78 trees and a million pebbles in the driveway and more. It's a generous medium, photography." -- Lee Friedlander

  2. #12

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    My experience is that a tankless heater doesn't work for darkroom applications, there is no buffering with regard to flow rates for example. I eventually went for a 4.5 kW 15L dedicated unit that can re-heat with enough power to provide hot while still under load. The 3 kW units cannot do this. However, a large tank would work fine provide it isn't depleted.

    Tom

  3. #13
    ROL
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    Minimum low flow rates. Of course, go figure. Thanks for the cogent discussion, everyone.

  4. #14
    Dave Swinnard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by msage View Post
    About 5 years ago I worked in a lab that had a gas tankless water heater and we had nothing but problems maintaining 70 degrees for B&W processing. When I built my darkroom I put in a 19 gal electric hot water heater in and has worked well. The only thing I would do different is a bigger one (40 gal).
    Hi Michael. This is good information.

    Can I ask why you feel you need a larger tank? Do you routinely run out of hot/warm water during your normal processing situations?

  5. #15
    David Brown's Avatar
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    In my last darkroom, I put in a 10 gallon electric tank. It proved to be useless as I didn't turn it on unless I was working in the darkroom, and then it took too long to heat, and then ran out too soon. My current darkroom is plumbed for a heater, but I have yet to install one. However, I'm in Texas and you're in Canada, so things are different.

    If and when I do install a heater, it will be a standard 40-50 gallon model, which I have seen used successfully in other local darkrooms. In all the years I've been on internet forums, I not heard much good about tankless in a darkroom situation. It's the flow rate.

  6. #16
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    I have tankless hot water in my entire house, not to be confused with instant hot water. This includes tanklesss in the darkroom. Works great, I love it. Mine runs on propane. Bill Barber

  7. #17
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    You could move to Texas where you really don't need a water heater most of the year. Bill Barber

  8. #18
    MattKing's Avatar
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    I wonder about having a tankless heater that is used to fill a tank heater that is only used when you are working in the darkroom.

    Or two smaller tank heaters in parallel.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  9. #19

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    I'm a plumber. Save yourself a lot of potential headaches and get a minimum of a 30 gallon water heater.
    Dave

    "She's always out making pictures, She's always out making scenes.
    She's always out the window, When it comes to making Dreams.

    It's all mixed up, It's all mixed up, It's all mixed up."

    From It's All Mixed Up by The Cars

  10. #20

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    We have a whole house gas fired tankless water heater, at the low flow rates appropriate for washing it doesn't come on.
    For the darkroom I have a small point of use tank heater on the hot line that takes care of that problem. It's only 2.5 gallons, so it's easy to run it out of heated water if I'm using a lot of water, but it isn't a problem for normal use. It runs on 110 power, so that makes things easy.

    For a point of use tankless heater you would want to look at what its minimum flow rate is for activation. My recommendation would be a point of use tank water heater if power and space aren't issues. Though, the 10 gallon and smaller ones will fit pretty much anywhere.

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