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  1. #11
    winger's Avatar
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    I have a large sheet of matboard that's white on one side and black on the other. I have a couple of different pieces from it with a hole in each, usually sorta closer to one end and side since I rarely need to burn a spot right in the middle. I have other pieces I can adjust the hole size with as well. The pieces that got cut out got taped to coat hangar remains for dodging. The larger pieces are also what I use when making test strips to cover what isn't getting exposed.

  2. #12
    Double Negative's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    For something really complex, a reduced size print with appropriately cut holes makes a useful burning tool.
    Absolutely! In fact, you can project the image onto cardboard/whatever and trace the outline of your shape or area - then cut it out.

  3. #13
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    i made myself a burning tool out of red card board, which allows me to vary hole size and shapebut soetimes a custom tool is required for more intricat shapes.only one rule applies to all burning efforts.keep it moving or you will see tell_tale signs of the burn and that is ugly.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  4. #14
    Bruce Osgood's Avatar
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    I have a stack of styrofoam plates that I rip apart and punch holes in as needed.

  5. #15
    Truzi's Avatar
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    I've used a piece of cardboard; used the edges, and had a hole cut in it for smaller areas.
    Truzi

  6. #16
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    tape some white paper on one side cut out the hole. this will allow you to see where you are burning.
    Quote Originally Posted by ToddB View Post
    Thanks for the tips guys. I found a piece of black gator board lying in the shop here at work. Just cut a small square out in the center.

    ToddB

  7. #17
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    For large area burning I use a single piece of flexible black paper. Since it's flexible I can bend it, and when I subsequently tilt the paper so it isn't parallel with the paper surface, it forms all kinds of different shapes.

    I almost never find the need to burn in small areas, but when I do I use a combination of my hands and a piece of board with one small and one large hole cut in it. I've used them maybe a dozen times in all these years.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  8. #18
    sly
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    I keep a stack of dud prints next to the enlarger. I use my hands, when that works. I grab a print (or 2 or more) for edge burning, or making a V shape, or punching a hole in, or tracing a horizon...... Oddly, I never seem to run out of dud prints

  9. #19
    ROL
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    I use cheap, stiff, wood pulp mat board (the best and only use for this type of board, IMO), white on one side (toward enlarger), black on other (toward print), of all sizes, some with cut holes of various sizes and type to fit each job. Some have holes taped with painters or gaffers tape with which to fine tune their "design". BTW, I use the same board, taped pieces to light wire, to construct dodging wands, as needed. In either case, proper technique requires that you hold the cards far enough away from the print that its penumbra will not result in a hard edge burning line, and keep them moving. Even I find it somewhat stunning how low–tech my required "tools" are for burning and dodging fine art prints.

  10. #20

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    All of the above are great suggestions. I have a few additional suggestions I can offer. First, whatever burning tool you use (applies to dodging as well), practice, practice, practice without paper until you are proficient at burning the areas you want at the amount of time you want. Second, I find a foot switch to be invaluable. Third, wherever possible, burn a larger area all at once. When I started out, I constructed a bunch of opaque cards with different sized shapes cut out of the middle (e.g., holes, ovals, squares, rectangles, triangles). I was spending too much time moving the card back and forth, to and fro, up and down all the while trying to get the right amount of additional exposure to a large area. Now, I will use my hand, a combination of opaque materials, and even a cutout of the shape so that I can burn a larger area all at once. If a large area needs more burning at one end, I burn the entire area for the common amount of time and use a different burning tool on the area that needs more exposure still. This change in burning practices made a huge improvement in both efficiency and results. I still use the original burning tools, but only for situations where the tool is appropriate (e.g., burning in a street lamp's light in a night shot).
    Bob Walberg

    The fix is in!

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