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  1. #1

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    Trouble loading 35 mm 36 exposure in plastic devloping tank

    I am having trouble loading my 35mm 36 exposure rolls into my ansco plastic tank. I have no difficulty loading the 24 exposure roll into the reel. The reel features the ratchet system of the Paterson type tank. The ansco is definitely old......however it may have seen 100 rolls of film. Is it the 36 exposure causing trouble or would the Paterson tank simplify and ease the process. I have been reluctant to switch to stainless steel tanks.....unless this is the answer.
    Thanks for the guidance.....my last roll was the roll from hell.

    David

  2. #2

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    Please describe in detail what the difficulty is. We (APUG menbers) can better understand the problem and provide a solution for you. 36's can be a bit of a bother even with the best reels.

  3. #3
    Dr Croubie's Avatar
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    Is it that once you get more and more film on the spool, it gets harder and harder to wind?
    I've had that problem with 24/36 and with 120. Best advice I ever read was to run a pencil around the grooves in the plastic reel, then the film just slips on so much easier...
    (also, one really good thing about 135 is that you can get it started in the light for maybe 5cm or so, then do the rest in the dark room/bag.
    An awful lot of electrons were terribly inconvenienced in the making of this post.

  4. #4

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    Are you saying that the 36 is OK as far into the reel as the 24 and then gets difficult or does the 36 start to have problems much nearer the start?

    Clearly the 24 doesn't go as far into the centre of the reel once it has been loaded so if problems start with the 36 after that point then it suggests that the "sticky parts of the reel may be nearer the centre which the 24 never touches.

    Have a good look at the reel, check for nicks or any roughness in it, thoroughly clean it with a toothbrush and use Dr Croubie's idea. It has to be the reel. There is nothing intrinsically different between the same make of film whether it is 24 or 36 frame as far as I know

    pentaxuser

  5. #5
    polyglot's Avatar
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    Rinse the reel for a few minutes in very hot (60C) water - hot enough that you can't hold your hand in it. That will get rid of any residual stickiness. Run the pencil over it once dry and then (most importantly), blast it with a hairdryer immediately before use. The hairdryer gets it that little bit more dessicated and allows the film to slide freely instead of sticking.

    Some people remove the silver balls from their paterson spirals to allow the film to run in more freely, it's a personal-preference thing. It's not as ratchety if you do that, but it will reduce jamming at the entrance.

  6. #6
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Very good advice already given and when you load a 36 exposure film, you may have to make smaller turns of the spiral as it gets towards the end. Gently touch each side of the back of the film with part of your thumbs as it winds in at the start of the spiral. That way you can feel it moving, if only slightly as it gets towards the end.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  7. #7

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    Try clipping the corners off the leading edge of the film between the sprocket holes. This might help it feed into the reel better.

  8. #8

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    listening to all the hoops and jumps you have to go through to use those plastic reels just makes me very glad I took the tiny bit of extra effort to learn to use stainless steel ... 40 years later the film still just slides on.

    The biggest problem with these ratchet reels is that you are pushing a 5-foot length of film from its far end into a thin plastic tube, essentially, and it is going to bind if there's the least bit of moisture or grease or anything fatter than a bad intention anywhere along that 5 feet of tube.

    With SS, you just make sure it's pretty dry, crimp the film just so and on it goes. I really don't understand why folks fear those things.

  9. #9
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Practice, patience, and cleanliness.

    Sacrifice an un-shot roll in daylight; practice until its easy.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  10. #10
    AgX
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    An alternative to changing to steel reels would be reels of the Jobo system, either the old clear ones or the newer white ones.

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