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  1. #41
    eddie's Avatar
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    With an 8 oz. tank, there shouldn't be a problem, assuming the tank is tilted for pouring.
    For large tanks (6-120 rolls), I use Thomas' method. The length of time required for a decent fill, without creating air bubbles, pretty much guarantees that the top reels will have an area of film which will get more exposure to the developer as it enters the tank. It's almost impossible to angle a tank, and turn it with one hand, and pour in the developer. The film located directly under the pour is going to get more development than the film located above the pour. I hope I'm making sense. In my head, I'm describing it well. On reading it, maybe not so much...

  2. #42

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    Ran three rolls now, no uneven development.
    I know the Kodak datasheets recommend dunking the reel into the filled tank
    I think I'll stick to Paterson for larger tanks

  3. #43
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Uneven development is more likely to be a problem with short development times or very large daylight tanks, and you can get uneven staining with even very dilute staining developers, like PMK pyro.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
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  4. #44
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb View Post
    Uneven development is more likely to be a problem with short development times or very large daylight tanks, and you can get uneven staining with even very dilute staining developers, like PMK pyro.
    Agreed. I normally develop only one roll at a time, simply because it's easier to keep a watchful eye on each roll and potential frames. If I do more than two at a time I end up not looking carefully enough at each roll, to great disservice of the amount of negatives I 'discover'.

    But sometimes when I come back from a photography trip, with 50 or so exposed rolls of film, I may use the big tank for 4x120 / 8x135 just to get it done, and that's when I feel lowering the reels into an already full tank will be of the largest benefit (or take the lid off the tank in total darkness and pour the developer into the already loaded tank).
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  5. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    If you are worried about filling and emptying the fluid content of your developing tank, then consider this alternative:

    Use tanks that already has the liquid in them, and use lifters to transfer the reels from one tank to the next in darkness.
    This completely eliminates the risk of uneven development due to pouring liquid into the tank.

    Obviously you need more than one tank for this, and a different working method, but it is a better way of uniformly coating ALL of the film with chemistry within a split second.

    Edit: Or what konical said above.
    The preferred method is to drop the loaded reel into a prefilled tank, cap and begin agitation.

    Pour out and do stop or just fix. Out pour has little chance of marking film, so only one tank is required.

    When I did E6, I used a lift rod and 6 tanks, 6 chem steps, because there was less chance of contamination.

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