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  1. #11

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    When you say that you are falling in love with 8x10 paper do you mean that you want to do 8x10 prints? The easiest way is to do what I think Christopher Walrath has suggested which is to project the negative as an 8x10 then place the Paterson test strip printer on the most important area which is usually one with a range of zones from shadows to highlights then establish the best overall exposure for the print and using the other strips which will be lighter and darker than the best exposure strip, establish burning and dodging times as well.

    pentaxuser

  2. #12
    Rhodes's Avatar
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    I am already doing 8x10 and 7x9,5 prints, due to have old 2 of 100 sheets paper boxes (almost full) and I'm using for the first prints, learning how to put the negs on the carrier, putting the easel right, errors, etc.
    Well, will look for a test printer and see.

  3. #13
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    If you want a test printer then by all means get one. Just realize you do not have to wait. If you are starting to print, then use one of the other methods mentioned above and get to the magic.
    Thank you.
    -CW

    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher Walrath View Post
    If you want a test printer then by all means get one. Just realize you do not have to wait. If you are starting to print, then use one of the other methods mentioned above and get to the magic.
    +1 to what has been said above. Either Chris' method or Doremus Scudder's will give you what you need. You don't have to wait until you get a Paterson test strip printer.

    If you are good in a workshop or have access to a machine shop then have a look at Ralph Lambrecht's site called " Darkroom Magic" where he gives instructions for a 5x7 inch test strip printer. A workshop engineer could easily modify this to accept bigger paper such as 8x10 although I don't think this is necessary.

    What might be advantageous is an opening in the test strip printer which gave you an inch and a half or even two inch strips with longer paper such as 5x8 inch( a 8x10 cut in half on the 10 inch side) so you would still have four sections of two inches or even 4 x 10 inch( 8x10 cut in half but on the 8 inch side) so you would have five two inch sections.

    Best of luck and tell us how you get on. Once you get the right test strip things will get better

    pentaxuser

  5. #15

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    Well I use a soft graphite pencil and write 45 and draw a line above set the timer for 45 then place the card over the 45 up to the line write 50 and another line and give the paper another five...

    after dev and stop I have a record in fix bath...

    works ok on semi matt

    I split grade print so do several strips...

    And to tell the truth I scan twice first for straight A4 inkjet which I laminate and gloss with a Sharpie or China graph with scanner densiometry from 2nd scan.

    But I can still fill a waste bin with rejects over a week end, unless the neg is good.

  6. #16
    fotch's Avatar
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    I have one like the FirstCall but made by Kodak. Works well although I like the type moves the paper so you compare the exact same part.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  7. #17
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    I have used something like that from Kodak for years. It is a useful tool.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  8. #18
    Rhodes's Avatar
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    I got one and other darkroom stuff that I need it! ALready used it and it's quite good thing to have!

  9. #19

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    I recently purchased some new ones to replace a couple old Kodak ones. They were getting very scratched up.

    On the new one, density was off. So prints were way off what the scale showed me. Took me awhile to figure out wtf...

    Problem with those print calculators are that they're small, and only give you a portion of your print. I have tried with multiples (as I have a few of them), but with pie wedges, they really aren't good for a lot of prints.

    If I were honest with myself, nothing beats test strips......

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