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  1. #21

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    For what it is worth I have the Time-O-Lite and it works well for me.
    My suggestion is not to worry about digital or clock-type but something you will use and go to the dark side and print!

  2. #22
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaydebruyne View Post
    Thanks, Matt! I've got my eye on a Peterson copy on eBay! I'll look up what f-stop printing is in the meantime

    I hope you don't mind an unrelated question to what the post is about, but other than a difference in light output, why does an enlarger lens have an aperture range? Or is that the sole purpose? Does it actually effect focus? Does a smaller aperture give you a sharper image?

    :/
    Every lens has a "sweet" spot - an aperture setting where the various aberrations inherent in real world lens design are at their minimum total effect, and diffraction limiting hasn't started having a large effect.

    For most enlarging lenses, that "sweet" spot setting is about two stops down from maximum opening.

    Sometimes however, that "sweet" spot opening either lets too much light through, or lets too little light through, to give you practical enlarging times, so you need to adjust the aperture away from it.

    In addition, you generally want to compose and focus on the easel with as much light as possible, in order to see best what you are doing. Then you stop down to your printing aperture.

    Finally, smaller apertures will give you greater depth of focus (helps slightly with curly negatives) as well as greater depth of field (enables adjusting for converging parallels and helps with curly printing paper).
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by jacaquarie View Post
    For what it is worth I have the Time-O-Lite and it works well for me.
    My suggestion is not to worry about digital or clock-type but something you will use and go to the dark side and print!
    Agreed.

    I want to purchase a timer I can use while I learn the basics, but one I can use later on when I'm more experienced and get more creative.

    I don't want to buy the same kit twice! And I like to research

    (I'm contradicting my opening question I know, but people's views sometimes puts my own into perspective)
    I'm going to run with both hands...

  4. #24
    jaydebruyne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Every lens has a "sweet" spot - an aperture setting where the various aberrations inherent in real world lens design are at their minimum total effect, and diffraction limiting hasn't started having a large effect.

    For most enlarging lenses, that "sweet" spot setting is about two stops down from maximum opening.

    Sometimes however, that "sweet" spot opening either lets too much light through, or lets too little light through, to give you practical enlarging times, so you need to adjust the aperture away from it.

    In addition, you generally want to compose and focus on the easel with as much light as possible, in order to see best what you are doing. Then you stop down to your printing aperture.

    Finally, smaller apertures will give you greater depth of focus (helps slightly with curly negatives) as well as greater depth of field (enables adjusting for converging parallels and helps with curly printing paper).
    Ahhhhh *penny drops* and the longer the lens, the bigger I can make the print? As I have a 50mm and and an 80mm lens.
    I'm going to run with both hands...

  5. #25
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaydebruyne View Post
    Ahhhhh *penny drops* and the longer the lens, the bigger I can make the print? As I have a 50mm and and an 80mm lens.
    Nope.

    Enlargers work backwards when compared with cameras (they are like projectors).

    The shorter the lens, the higher the magnification.

    But .....

    Generally, you don't use shorter enlarging lenses than the ones that are recommended for your format (50mm for 35mm film, 80mm for 6x4.5 - 6x6 or sometimes 6x7) because the shorter lenses won't cover the larger negatives. By "cover", I mean sharply focus all the detail in the negative right out to the corners. The 50mm lens will sharply render the centre of a 6x6 negative, but the corners won't be sharp, and may not be shown at all on your print.

    You choose the enlarging lens based on coverage and you adjust the enlarger to set the magnification.

    Hope this helps.

    PS there are special purpose exceptions to the above - like wide angle enlarging lenses - but its best to consider the usual choices for now.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaydebruyne View Post
    Ahhhhh *penny drops* .
    Methinks you would benefit from spending a day or two with an experienced darkroom user.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaydebruyne View Post
    So,

    Obviously there will be greater precision with digital timers, but for a brand new starter like me, do I need such precision like 1/10 of a second at this stage?
    I'm a big fan of f/stop timingand determine print exposure bu highlight densitywith an accuracy of 1/12 stop.finer increments are hard to see for me, but 1/6stop is too course for my tasteI usually dodge or burn in 1/3 or 1/6 stop increments. for my way of working1/10s is useful, but a dedicated f/stop timer is more practical than a linear timer in my opinion.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  8. #28
    jaydebruyne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paul_c5x4 View Post
    Methinks you would benefit from spending a day or two with an experienced darkroom user.
    Unfortunately I don't have that luxury. Besides, it's a fun journey to research and put into practise what I learn, rather than being shown. I guess I like learning the hard way
    I'm going to run with both hands...

  9. #29
    jaydebruyne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Nope.

    Enlargers work backwards when compared with cameras (they are like projectors).

    The shorter the lens, the higher the magnification.
    Gotchya! Thanks Matt.
    I'm going to run with both hands...

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by fretlessdavis View Post
    However, I have been playing bass for over a decade (mostly jazz) and have been noted for having excellent time and groove. My girlfriend is a drummer, so she's definitely not a slouch with beat/groove either. YMMV depending on your musical skill, though.
    I was a rapper for 12 years with a live band, my timing is pretty good also played acoustic guitar for a few years. Nice to meet another muso
    I'm going to run with both hands...

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