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  1. #1
    andrel23's Avatar
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    'Nocon timer' From 220V to 110V

    Hi there,

    I am a new owner of an enlarger timer called 'Nocon Timer'. I got it from a fellow in south africa. Knowing that south africa, like many countries in Europe, are using
    220 Volts. Here, like everybody know, we are using 110. I have bought a converter to convert our 110 to 220 volts that the timer needs to be operating. Thus, this timer has an outlet to feed the enlarger. Do I need a converter also to reduce the 220 from the timer than back to the enlarger that is using 110 volts?

    Thanks for your help!

  2. #2
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    I'd get a timer made for 110v.

  3. #3

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    Yes, you would need another converter for the enlarger. Or put a 220V bulb in the enlarger.

  4. #4
    Bob Marvin's Avatar
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    You have 60 Hz AC current; the timer is probably made for 50 Hz, so the timing will be off.

  5. #5

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    Well you don't see those everyday!
    Gene Nocon, master printer, wonderful stuff.
    "Photographic Printing" by Gene is one of my all time favorite books.
    Have fun with it!

  6. #6
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Marvin View Post
    You have 60 Hz AC current; the timer is probably made for 50 Hz, so the timing will be off.
    I doubt that it uses the supply frequency for timing - but if it did, it would still be consistent.

    You don't need a transformer to go back down to 110 volts. A relay with a coil rated at 220 volts can be used to switch your enlarger on, connected to the 110 volt supply.

    You could probably find a local electrician who could make this for you. However, it might be worth getting someone to look inside the timer to see if it can be converted to 110 volts. Often, equipment is fitted with a transformer with two primary windings, both 110 vlts. They are connected in parrallel for 110 volts and in series for 220 volts. You might be lucky!


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  7. #7

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    Easy things first. Check the voltage of the enlarger output.

    I would imagine(!) that 110 in can't give you 220 out. A simple voltmeter will disclose it's deepest secrets.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  8. #8

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    He's feeding 220V into the timer. I would imagine(!) that 220 in can't give you 110 out.

    Another option is to modify the timer such that the built-in relay switches a separate 110V supply. So the timer would have 2 power cords; the existing 220V for the timer itself and an additional 110V for the timer's enlarger relay switching contacts, not the solenoid. But it gets a bit messy that way and a mistake is easily made. Therefore I wouldn't recommend that route.

    Voltage converters are fairly cheap, check out these guys, they're in Montreal as well. But first see if the timer's internal power supply can be set to 110V.
    Last edited by spijker; 03-04-2014 at 03:58 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #9

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    My assumption (US practice based) is your abode is wired with 2 phases of 110-120 ac input at the breaker panel. That is 220 phase to phase and 110 each Phase to the Neutral. In the US the "Dryer Plug" or "Electric Stove Plug" is 30 to 50 amp per phase 220 rated. It might be there, just in an inconvenient place.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by spijker View Post
    He's feeding 220V into the timer. I would imagine(!) that 220 in can't give you 110 out.

    Another option is to modify the timer such that the built-in relay switches a separate 110V supply. So the timer would have 2 power cords; the existing 220V for the timer itself and an additional 110V for the timer's enlarger relay switching contacts, not the solenoid. But it gets a bit messy that way and a mistake is easily made. Therefore I wouldn't recommend that route.

    Voltage converters are fairly cheap, check out these guys, they're in Montreal as well. But first see if the timer's internal power supply can be set to 110V.
    I misinterpreted the OP. But yes, it's stepping up not down. DOH!
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

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