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  1. #1
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    Jobo 2502 Reels - how to load

    I just got a set of Jobo 2502 reels for developing C41 120 film at home (thanks to the demise of Calumet, I no longer have a reasonably priced source for processing 120 color neg with a reasonable turnaround time). I'm used to using stainless steel reels, so I was wondering if anyone has any tips on how to load them, or better yet, videos.

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    We will load a video this weekend - stay tuned.
    CatLABS of JP
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    www.catlabs.info | https://www.facebook.com/CatLABS.of.JP | www.jobo-usa.com

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    I just got a set of Jobo 2502 reels for developing C41 120 film at home .
    A few tips that work for me - ymmv
    The reels have to be bone dry. If not, wait until tomorrow.

    I load mine in a darkroom, where I have a counter to work with - I align the two sides of the reel and set the reel on the countertop before the lights go so that the flat spot is down, and it doesn't roll.

    If I am loading several rolls, I load one reel at a time, put it in the drum and put the lid on the drum, then turn on the lights (I have a dim light option in my darkroom), and set up for the next reel.

    I trim the corners of the film with a pair of scissors so that the corners don't get caught in the reel on the way in.
    I gently push the film about an inch into the end of the spiral - you feed these from the outside in, not like steel where you work from the inside out.
    I hold the reel in my hands with one hand on each side of the reel, and my fingertips just after the opening to the spiral where the film enters the reel. My fingertips are gently on the back of the film.
    Rotate the sides of the reel back and forth, walking the film into the reel. You can feel with your fingertips if something is going wrong, and you can feel the film walking into the reel.
    It is easiest to use one reel per roll of film, but if you want to do two, what I find is easiest is when you get to the end of the first roll, stop with an inch or so of film still outside the reel, take your second roll, trim the corners, and tape the begining of the second roll to the end of the first, being careful to have everything lined up straight, then just continue walking the film into the reel and you will eventually get the second roll onto the reel.

    Jobo has a different technique that they preach which involves walking the first roll into the middle of the reel, and then putting a little plastic thingy in place and loading the second roll - This has not always worked for me, but I am sure that there are others who have good luck with it.

    There are stainless reels that work with the Jobo tanks, but I have no experience with those.

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    A tip for thin films: peel the tape away from only the backing paper, then fold it over the end of the roll of film. Use your thumb nail to make sure it's firmly in place. Load that end first. The additional stiffness provided by the tape makes for smooth loading.

  5. #5
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Then twist the sides of the reel back and forth and the film will walk its way in.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

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    I reduce the natural curl of the first corners of the film by gently bending back, trying the make it as even as possible.

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    CatLABS - did you ever by chance get to upload the video to YouTube?

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    I posted this very same question on the LFF site about the same time that you posted it here and never got any informative responses. But I have been shooting color negative in volume and due to the volume of chemistry required to process it ( 1L per 3/rolls), I have been using the 2500 series drums on my Jobo CPA-2 with the 2502 reels. After three successive runs this is what I currently believe to be the correct way to load the reels keeping in mind that I don't trim the leading edge into a V shape: Upon threading the leading edge into the slot and pulling it through to around the half-way point, gently continue to thread the roll onto the reel with the index fingers by "pushing" it onto the reel without "walking" it on by alternating twist. When you feel that it has gone about as far as it can go with that method, then start walking it by alternating twist but only applying a very light pressure on the film edge with each index finger on the twist side. When you think you have gone about as far as you can go with that method, revert back to pushing it through with both index fingers on either side of the film edges protruding from the sides of the reel. My mistake in the past was in applying too much pressure against the film edge which resulted in jamming the opposite corner of the film against the reel preventing its forward progress which is apparently easier to do with the 2502 than with the 1500 reels because of the greater reel size.

    I hope that the above is indeed the case because if it is then I have mastered loading the 2502 reels which are superior to the 1500.

    Thomas
    Last edited by Tom Taylor; 04-22-2014 at 10:38 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Thomas

    No art passes our conscience in the way that film does, and goes directly to our feelings, deep down into the dark rooms of our souls.
    — Ingmar Bergman

  9. #9
    vpwphoto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    I just got a set of Jobo 2502 reels for developing C41 120 film at home (thanks to the demise of Calumet, I no longer have a reasonably priced source for processing 120 color neg with a reasonable turnaround time). I'm used to using stainless steel reels, so I was wondering if anyone has any tips on how to load them, or better yet, videos.
    I see you are in DC. CSW in Chicago, is my latest E-6 processor, I suppose they do C-41. (shhhh don't tell them I think their E-6 prices are very fair, seems spot on, and they don't charge and arm and leg to "handle and ship".__)

    They are my fourth or fifth E-6 lab in the past 8 years. They all seem to be falling like dominos. The first one closed and I said you are over-reacting to this digital stuff.... (ah they got out when the getting was good). My last lab (across the street from me) was low volume, but closed because he didn't want to "mess with internet sales". I used to give him 10-20 rolls a week along with the hobby/slide shooters in the area... but the vacation shooters went digital, and my E-6 needs went to 6 rolls a month, to 6 rolls a YEAR!

    http://www.cswfilmsystems.com/

  10. #10

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    The pro lab in my area moved about 40 miles away to Santa Cruz at thee same time that Jobo announced that it was no longer going to manufacture the processors. That's when I bought a new CPA-2 (at a discount even!) and never looked back. Before then I always processed and printed my B&W by hand.

    Thomas
    Thomas

    No art passes our conscience in the way that film does, and goes directly to our feelings, deep down into the dark rooms of our souls.
    — Ingmar Bergman

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