Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,502   Posts: 1,543,403   Online: 731
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 22
  1. #11
    Bruce Osgood's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Brooklyn, N.Y. USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,433
    Images
    45
    Neal,
    I know exactly what you are saying about the Kodak. I have and use an old Jobo Process mercury thermometer. It floats in bubbling water and is calibrated in celsius and if it breaks I will get another one. Bob F and Ryuji make good reasoning I think. But you are going to be using it daily (I hope) so it is to your needs that must be met.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Italia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,680
    http://www.control3.com/4373p.htm

    That's the one I want. BUT I can't find anybody locally that sells it for a reasonable price. Found a few US suppliers but they all wanted both arms and a leg for shipping. Wow is me.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    3,268
    Look at this page - http://www.jobo-usa.com/products/mis...m#Thermometers and look for the Jobo Color Thermometer. It uses blue spirit, not mercury, there is less issue if you break it. It goes from 15 to 30C in 0.2C increments. Immersion level is about 1 inch.

    This will be much more accurate and precise than any dial or inexpensive digital thermometer. Don't forget, even if you have a digital thermometer, if it only reads to 1 degree increments, the uncertainty in your measurements will be +/- 1 degree. The Jobo I've listed above will be much more precise.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,879
    Images
    11
    I have a $15.00 digital cooking thermometer (eBay) that I have been using over the past year. Its range is -40 degrees F to 450 degrees F and reads in 0.1 degree increments. It has a long stainless steel probe which I find useful.

    I periodically check it against our calibrated lab standards and have found that it is in good agreement (plus or minus 0.1 degree in my range of interest).
    Tom Hoskinson
    ______________________________

    Everything is analog - even digital :D

  5. #15
    eric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,586
    Images
    55
    Thermometer?! I just put my finger in.
    No really, I have 3! 2 westons and 1 Spiratone. Each has a nut for calibration. In 20 years, they seemed to have been moved slightly so each one give me a different temp.

    I kid you not, I stick 2 or 3 in solution, average it out, and I go from there. Works for me. They are all 1 degree off each other so I figure, one must be okay.

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Westport, MA.
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,058
    I'd go for a thermocouple personally.. Search on E*ay for 'thermocouple' and look for an older Omega thermocouple or something similar. There are industrial submersible thermocouple probes, etc. Many of the Omega thermocouples have multiple probe inputs so you could keep track of many different temperatures.

    I have a Cooper/Atkins FW2000 and it is 100% waterproof. I've seen pictures of this unit being submerged in a bucket of ice and giving a reading. The display is digital, the readout is quick and more accurate than you'd probably need. You can also calibrate it yourself if you wish.

    It might be a bit overkill but i've gone through too many thermometers. My kodak tank and tray thermometer is off by 10C !!!

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Italia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,680
    Quote Originally Posted by Phillip P. Dimor

    It might be a bit overkill but i've gone through too many thermometers. My kodak tank and tray thermometer is off by 10C !!!
    My old thermometer used to be off by 5C but it was always off by exactly 5C. Perfectly repeatable in the range I needed to check.

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Louisiana, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,325
    I have a non-adjustable Tele-Tru dial thermometer I must have bought sometime in 1973 or 1974. I don't know how truly accurate it is but it is consistent. Results have been good, so I use its temperature readings as baseline. I doubt its being made anymore. I also have a Weston dial thermometer that I calibrated to the Tele-Tru and now use it the most. It's nothing special but it's been holding the calibration accurately.

  9. #19
    Flotsam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    S.E. New York State
    Posts
    3,221
    Images
    13
    Just thought I'd tack my final decision to the bottom of this thread.

    I think that my darkroom conditions favor using a dial thermometer over a digital. The Weston addresses all of my original complaints, the mirror helps the parallax and the B&W temps are in the middle of the scale.
    It appears that both the large and small dial have the all-important cailibration nut so I think that I'll go for the small dial to minimise needle vibration. I figure that a small needle will vibrate less and damp down quicker.

    With the news about B&H, I think I'll put in an order with Adorama. I'd use Calumet but I need to order a bunch of paper too and their prices awfully high on that.

    Thanks to everyone for the help.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  10. #20
    bobfowler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    New Jersey, Land of the Living Dead
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,440
    Images
    19
    I picked up a Pyrex brand digital thermometer at Sears for about $15 a few months back. It has a probe with a cable that's about 1 meter long and is very accurate. It runs on a single AAA battery.
    Bob Fowler
    fowler@verizon.net
    Some people are like Slinkies. They're really good for nothing, but they still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin