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  1. #1

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    Painting a darkroom sink

    I want to sell a fiberglass darkroom sink. It's stained and I wanted to know if anyone has ever painted one before. I was also thinking of using the spray cans which have the same material in them as is used in truck beds. If I did use the spray, do you think the chemicals will have a negative reaction?

    Thanks for the help,
    Jim

  2. #2
    Monophoto's Avatar
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    The best choice would probably be two-component epoxy paint - look for it at a marine supplies place. It's impervious to most chemicals.

  3. #3

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    Home Depot sells a polyurethane waterproof paint in an arctic-white color. I used it for my plywood sink, and it is still waterproof after three years (knock on plywood). It is a single component, and fairly cheap. It will have to be brushed on unless you have a mighty industrial sprayer.
    In applying it to fiberglass, I would scuff the surface with 200 grit paper to give it a tooth to hold the paint; wash it with a warm TSP solution; dry thoroughly and apply two coats. Voila! Ready for sale.

  4. #4

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    I suppose it depends upon whether you want to remain friends with the buyer.

    Paints are not so permanent as the fiberglass resin. Photo-flo makes them bubble and reticulate, just like paint remover. The only method which will be permanent is to lightly sand the sink (to give it a tooth) and then apply an opaque fiberglass Gelcoat in your choice of color. White is often the best. Look in the yellow pages for a marina, boat dealer or fiberglass supplier. A quart should do it.

    Plan B would be to remove the stain with bleach and/or powdered bathroom cleanser containing bleach. Both work very well. But the sink will continue to stain from new developers dumped but not quickly rinsed away.

  5. #5

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    If it were me looking at buying a sink, and it was newly painted... I'd be asking myself "what are they trying to hide".

    I would personally leave it as it is, and suggest options to hide the stain if it's bothersome to the customer. Telling them that you thought of painting it, but wanted to show it as it truly was, would help gain their confidence in you as well.

    Just a thought,

    joe

  6. #6
    geraldatwork's Avatar
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    I second the bleach try. If bleach doesn't work I would, as mentioned, give the buyer the option to see if they wanted it painted.
    "When elephants fight it is the grass that suffers"
    African proverb

    IRAQNAM is Bush's legacy

  7. #7

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    Thanks to all for the input. I did try bleach on one sink and it horribly discolored the sink. I tried it on another (first) and worked perfect. I will probably use the Marine paint on the discolored sink.

    Thanks again,
    Jim



 

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