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  1. #11

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    pull down blinds and velcro stripped darkening cloth ?

  2. #12
    AgX
    AgX is offline

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    I too haven't considered light leaks at a door other than at the bottom.

    Haven't all doors got flanges, and wouldn't these be sufficient?

  3. #13

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    No, they aren't always sufficient - my bathroom-darkroom door leaks light all the way round, flanges (sometimes called returns) notwithstanding.

    After messing about unsuccessfully trying to use foamstrip and so on, I ended up using a solution almost identical to jeffreyg

  4. #14

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    My darkroom had been a bathroom. I used plywood to cover the window, and weather stripping on the door with a add-on door sweep on the bottom. The door is now 100% light-tight, and except for requiring a bit of a push to latch, the mods aren't particularly noticeable.

  5. #15

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    My darkroom window has a double sliding horizontal window. I remove the sliding storm glass from one half and replace it with a piece of plywood the same dimensions as the storm window. Two muffin fans are mounted in the plywood, with a light tight baffle on the outside. I cover the other pane of the window with black visqueen. The plywood goes in and out in seconds.
    Nice work. You have a very talented computer.

  6. #16

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    That sounds like what I did once - put in self-assembly secondary glazing, and use plywood panels in place of the glass. That gave 50% of the window space for light when needed, and the window could be opened for ventilation. In the summer the join needed some tape.

    The other temporary case used a panel that was cut to fit the window frame with some black foam around the edges. That worked well. Both of these solutions were in the UK where a window sill would be over 6" deep. In California the walls are barely 6" thick and there is no sill to speak of.

    My current darkroom has two windows. I have them permanently blacked out by backing the glass withhardboard panels and sealed at the edge with black silicone. I can still open the window if I need to for any reason.
    I feel, therefore I photograph.

  7. #17

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    There's a material at Home Depot, it's essentially plastic cardboard. It's white on one side and black on the other, light weight and rigid. Cuts with a utility knife. Opaque. Indispensable for blocking light, whether it's windows or doors.

  8. #18
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    When I lived in an apartment I used a changing bag and 'daylight' tank for film processing. I printed only at night. In fact for the first 12 years of using my current darkroom I only printed at night due to this glass door that I only recently covered with a light-tight shade.
    Click image for larger version. 

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  9. #19
    studio 120's Avatar
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    I have just made a new blackout for our darkroom window.

    I wanted something removable so as to leave daylight in when needed. I made a frame with a border of about 3.5 inches which mounts to the window frame. Also used some rubber draught excluder in there to be sure of no light leaks. This frame then has a another frame of timber half way in, I used 2 x 1 trimmed down to about 3/8" in thickness. Then there is a 3/8" piece of medite ( mdf ) cut to fit this opening ( again sealed with draught excluder) which lifts in and out easily and is secured with some simple hardwood twist locks.

    I used medite as I tried ply before and hot weather warped it real bad. I also put some foam backed reflective foil on the back of the medite sheet to help reflect some of the heat away.

    The 3.5" frame can be painted to match the original window if necessary so doesn't look to ugly although in this case it doesn't matter as it's a permanent darkroom. I will take some pictures and put them up here asap.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by ula_mv View Post
    Oh my word, so many thoughts!

    You all have been incredibly helpful. I will be running the options by my roommates and figuring out what they're prefer as far as general obtrusiveness etc. goes. I have chalkboard paint on hand to prevent reflections. Everything that's been said is helpful in covering all the details. I hadn't even thought of light leaks around the door, just at the bottom, for instance. Perils of a first darkroom, I suppose.

    Thanks so much everyone!
    Here is how I do it. I like to be able to go from normal room to dark room in a few seconds. I think it looks okay too. Enjoy.

    Chris
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 00WhS7-252925584.jpg   00WhSC-252925684.jpg  

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