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  1. #11
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    I wonder what would happen if I put one of those twisted flourescent incandesent light bulb replacers in there? If you used the lowest "wattage" and then ND'd it down with vellum inside the filter until it passed a "safe" test.
    Maybe pick up some more brightness without the heat.
    Just thinking.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  2. #12
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    I wouldn't try either a higher wattage or twisted flourescent lamp in an enclosed Kodak bullet safelight. Brighter incandescent lamps will get too hot, the flourescents aren't typically designed for enclosed (and therefore hotter) fixtures, and the safelight filter will fade a lot faster if you overlight it. These safelight fixtures are completely unventilated, and run hotter than a typical light fixture. You should believe that Kodak has tested this stuff and knows the limits.

    I've never seen an LED spot in a home improvement store in the US. Most Americans think "brighter is better" and pay much less for electricity than Europeans, and manufacturers won't try to sell them LEDs as floodlights. We don't conserve water or electricity like the Europeans do. That being said, superbrightleds.com has Edison based 110VAC LED lamps in 630nm red and 590nm amber, but these are very bright and the circuit used to run them on AC makes them not significantly dimmable. See: http://superbrightleds.com/MR16_specs.htm for the Edison based and MR-16 alternatives.

    The superbrightleds MR-16 12V lamps and 12V "light bars" are fully dimmable with a 12VDC or lower power source and also come in the same amber and red that you could match to the paper you use. They also sell ceramic sockets for the MR-16 lamps that are a cinch to wire; strip two small guage wire ends and shove them into two holes. The other two ends go to your power supply. Prices are very good, but at the draw these LEDs take, you don't need the higher priced power supplies at superbrightleds. I usually get stuff from them about 2 days after I order, and they don't kill you with shipping or minimum orders.

    To power and dim my 12VDC darkroom safelight LEDs, I use this:
    http://www.partsexpress.com/pe/showd...number=120-536
    I got mine for about $4 each on sale, but at $15, they do nicely up to 2 amps, and have a built in 6 position voltage switch that can dim the LEDs. The LED arrays we're talking about draw milliamps, so you can run way more than you need off one of these supplies. Even most 12V "wall wart" ACto DC power adapters for portable electronics will run an LED light bar or MR-16, or two.

    Lee

    Just noticed that the power supply I recommended is out of stock and due back in May 1. Sorry about that. But it is a good option for this use.
    Last edited by Lee L; 03-05-2005 at 01:15 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #13
    127
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    I've got a couple of beehives that I aquired with 6B filters in - designed for X-ray work apparantly. They had 25 watt bulbs in so, that's what I replaced them with. Even so they're VERY dim. They're mounted about 2 feet from the work top, but it still looks pitch dark in there. A third behive has a more conventional filter in, but that's almost as dim.

    According to the spec, they're too close, too powerfull, and the wrong sort anyway! However as they're set up they're still FAR FAR less bright than the old cheapo safelight I used before. Occasionally I worry about it, but most of the time I think it's not a problem.

    I think kodak's spec is conservative. If I put 15W bulbs in, and bounced them off the roof I'd be in total darkness.

    The 25W's don't seem to be a problem. No they're not vented, but the cases are metal, and get moderatly hot, which allows the heat to disipate. Besides, my darkroom needs all the heat sources it can get!

    Ian

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flotsam
    I wonder what would happen if I put one of those twisted flourescent incandesent light bulb replacers in there? If you used the lowest "wattage" and then ND'd it down with vellum inside the filter until it passed a "safe" test.
    Maybe pick up some more brightness without the heat.
    Just thinking.
    Neal,
    I've got those fluorescent 'bulbs' all over my house. I use them for two reasons. Firstly because they throw better equivalent light to an incandescent at lower wattage. Secondly because they are much much cooler. Apparently, though, these bulbs don't last as long as they ought to if you keep turning them on and off. I have them in some places where they are constantly being switched on and off and they are fine, but who knows.

    You might have to check for clearance, though, 'cause the fluorescent spirals are quite a bit bigger than the little 15W bulbs in the safelight.

    BTW, I find Kodak's instructions on the safelight (I have the same one) very conservative. My darkroom is 6x6 and I had no choice but to place the safelight at a height of about 7ft and pointing straight out into my workspace. I did a paper test and even after 8 minutes there was absolutely nil fogging.

    Hope this helps,
    Kent
    Max Power, he's the man who's name you'd love to touch! But you mustn't touch! His name sounds good in your ear, but when you say it, you mustn't fear! 'Cause his name can be said by anyone!

  5. #15

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    A matter of choice.

    Although I use an old safelight that I received with a 7 watt bulb behind o a
    green filter for film latensification with a bulb dimmer set fairly low i do not otherwise use a safelight. I want to make certain that In the future I can repeat my printing of a negative from notes. So, I adjust my temperature before exposing the paper and process for the full two minutes and after fixing turn on the room lights. The print inspection light used with a bulb dimmer that is set to the light level that will be used to display the print. It is not hard to do it in the dark and I am not influenced by the appearance of the print as it develops. There are trade offs involved of course but I find it to work very nicely for me. It is cheap..no investment...no energy usage...extremely reliable...no safelight fog. I have several acquaintances that save me their burned out bulbs in case the total darkness becomes to oppressive..although the difference between total darkness and the burned out bulbs is very subtle, I find it to be emotionally satisfying to be able to make these distinctive choices and to fine tune my darkness.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Claire Senft
    I have several acquaintances that save me their burned out bulbs in case the total darkness becomes to oppressive..although the difference between total darkness and the burned out bulbs is very subtle,
    That is a good idea considering the ridiculous prices of new darkbulbs from photographic suppliers.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  7. #17
    rjr
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    LED spots

    Quote Originally Posted by eric
    This is interesting. I didn't know you can get screw in LED light "bulbs" that will fit a regular socket. Can youget these at Home Depot or Lowes?
    Most likely - you can get these in the german equivalent of RadioShack - Conrad.

    It´s the small standard bulb socket, used for reading lights etc... it comes with a DC/AC converter built in, so you just have to screw them into the socket and turn on the light. Power consumption is quite low, the light emitted is slightly less than that of a 25W bulb in a Beehive with Kodak Wratten Red-filter.

    For those who don´t know where to hold the soldering iron (NOT the hot one!), thats a good chance to illuminate the darkroom...
    Tschüss,
    Roman

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by 127
    I've got a couple of beehives that I aquired with 6B filters in - designed for X-ray work apparantly. They had 25 watt bulbs in so, that's what I replaced them with. Even so they're VERY dim. They're mounted about 2 feet from the work top, but it still looks pitch dark in there. A third behive has a more conventional filter in, but that's almost as dim.
    Ian
    I used to work with an old metal safelight with Agfa X-Ray filter and it was as dim as yours. These days I use one LED unit from Kaiser, bought in 2001 and the screw in LED E27/220 V. Consider some of these LED units, will make live a loooot easier.

    BTW, what camera are using to expose the 127 film? My Baby Rolleiflex (1957-63) is mostly on display.

    I use hot tea to warm up in the red light darkness district.

    Wolfram
    Colour? We can always use an airbrush later...

  9. #19
    127
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr.Kollig
    BTW, what camera are using to expose the 127 film? My Baby Rolleiflex (1957-63) is mostly on display.
    I've got way too many... (check my website!). The main shooters are a Gray Baby Rollei, and a Komaflex. I'm also hoping to get my Exacta back into a working state real soon...

    Ian

  10. #20

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    15watt flourcent is about equal to I think a 60watt normal bulb. It's a lot of light and maybe a lot of fog. Why do you want to read a newspaper in the darkroom? Mine is pretty close to dark. Red safelight for B&W. Total darkness for colour. What would I gain with a brighter safelight?

    BTW I think the 5x7 premier is only 15 watts to.

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