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  1. #1
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    Kodak Safelight Wattage

    Does anyone know the maximum wattage that can be used in a Kodak 5.5" round safelight with a kodak OC filter?

    I have been using a 15 watt bulb and I can't believe that it is really supposed to be that dim
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  2. #2
    Lee L's Avatar
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    Kodak bullet style housing, right?

    IIRC, recommendations are 15W bounced off the ceiling, 7W direct at > 4 feet.

    Since I've started back in the darkroom, I'm using LEDs with variable voltage power supply, both red and yellow. I haven't done the testing yet, but prefer to keep it at low levels.

    See testing methods at:

    http://www.kodak.com/global/en/consu...cts/pdf/k4.pdf

    Lee

  3. #3
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee L
    7W direct at > 4 feet.
    Might as well work in total darkness.

    One place that I worked had a sodium vapor safelight. You could read a newspaper without straining under that thing.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  4. #4
    Lee L's Avatar
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    I also ran a darkroom with the Thomas sodium vapor safelights (in the late '80s). I found them to be way too far open when I took over the darkroom from the previous printer, and had to completely close the louvers, even for the typical 60 seconds for which I had paper exposed in that darkroom. I used a roller transport processor with lids, so the processing was dark. I've heard people say more recently that they are not nearly as "safe" as once thought.

    If you want a source for very bright red and yellow LEDs at reasonable prices, try superbrightleds.com. I'm using their lightbars, strings, and MR16 bulbs running off a 12VDC power supply with variable voltage, bounced off the ceiling. You could get them to go as bright as the Thomas, and they'd be cheaper, but they'd also probably fog at that level.

    Lee

  5. #5
    eric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee L
    If you want a source for very bright red and yellow LEDs at reasonable prices, try superbrightleds.com. I'm using their lightbars, strings, and MR16 bulbs running off a 12VDC power supply with variable voltage, bounced off the ceiling. You could get them to go as bright as the Thomas, and they'd be cheaper, but they'd also probably fog at that level.

    Lee
    That's interesting. I should look that up. I used to put velum paper inside them until I got it toned down.

  6. #6
    rjr
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    Sodium Vapor has a big downside - the bulbs are expensive to replace and they´ll fail faster if you turn them on and off.

    If you are using an analyser of any type, LEDs are the way to go - last summer I had a friend to solder me a few banks of red and amber LEDs and a flashlight.

    I chose a mixture of red and amber ´cause it gave me a light tone suiting my taste and needs and it is safe with most papers.

    If you are going to DIY, check the specsheets of the LEDs. Papers made by Forte, Foma and Fotokemika usually demand red light, you are safe with LEDs emmitting light at 660nm. Most papers made by Agfa, Ilford and Kodak are safe with yellow/amber LEDs of 595nm.

    At the moment I am running three banks of approx 60LEDs (each 5000mcd) in total in a darkroom of 3,5x5m and I can read any paper, any book and table in there, the mixed light is safe for my Foma papers for 15min at each distance - haven´t run the test any longer, thats good enough.

    This setup plus a smallish LED flashlight cost me not more that 15EUR for the material.

    Plain and simple: It´s great.

    If you don´t wan´t to DIY, you can buy LED spots at many warehouses. These screw in E27 standard sockets and according to the spreadsheet the red type emits at 660nm. These are slightly more costly, 10-15EUR/"bulb", and a bit dimmer that the ultrabright LEDs.
    Tschüss,
    Roman

  7. #7
    David Brown's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flotsam
    Does anyone know the maximum wattage that can be used in a Kodak 5.5" round safelight with a kodak OC filter?

    I have been using a 15 watt bulb and I can't believe that it is really supposed to be that dim
    15 watt is the recommended. You could try a 25 watt and do the standard safelight test.

    What color are your darkroom walls?

    David

  8. #8
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    I think that I'll stick a clear 15w bulb in it just to try to milk a little more light out of it and try to find a cheap 5x7 Premier to fill out the area a bit.

    I thought that an expensive Kodak Glass OC filter would be pure enough to handle a little more brightness than some off-brand piece of amber colored plastic.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  9. #9
    rbarker's Avatar
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    I think I'd be cautious about putting an incandescent bulb higher than a 15W bulb in the bullet enclosure - might produce more heat than either the enclosure or the filter can handle.
    [COLOR=SlateGray]"You can't depend on your eyes if your imagination is out of focus." -Mark Twain[/COLOR]

    Ralph Barker
    Rio Rancho, NM

  10. #10
    eric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rjr
    If you don´t wan´t to DIY, you can buy LED spots at many warehouses. These screw in E27 standard sockets and according to the spreadsheet the red type emits at 660nm.
    This is interesting. I didn't know you can get screw in LED light "bulbs" that will fit a regular socket. Can youget these at Home Depot or Lowes?

    I have a LED small pocket flashlight that my son plays with. Few months now on the same 1 AA battery.

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