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  1. #1

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    analyser pro or stopclock with zonemaster

    i am confused as to which way i should go. i am an amateur and i want to buy what will do the job in the best way. what are the limitations of the analyser pro vs the stopclock-zonemaster combo. would i be giving up some functions or capabilities i would regret. the issue is not whether to buy rh but what to buy. i would appreciate any help you can give me.
    THANKYOU

  2. #2
    clogz's Avatar
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    Two years ago I decided to buy the Analyser Pro as it incorporates a timer function.
    Very pleased with the machine!
    Have you downloaded the various manuals from RHDesigns' website? www.rhdesigns.co.uk
    Digital is best taken with a grain of silver.

  3. #3
    JeffD's Avatar
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    I was thinking about the analyzer pro, and whether it would be something helpful to me.

    I don't use the standard 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 paper grade filters that the device is probably designed for.

    Instead, I use a dichro head with a continuous range between full yellow and no magenta to all magenta and no yellow light to vary my contrasts. Problem is, I have no idea exactly which of those combinations of yellow and magenta fall on those generally accepted grade numbers.

    So, in light of this, is the "densitometer" functions of the device likely to be any use to me? The device, I assume, has to know what paper "grade" I am using, to be able to display any info on where a tone might fall in the final print.

    I like the timer features, though. Just wondering if the analyzer function would be a waste of money for me. I assume the unit could be calibrated, but seems like this would be an impossible chore when you are talking about an infinite amount of contrast potential with the dial in filters....

  4. #4
    rbarker's Avatar
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    As I recall, there are some compatibility issues that relate to the type of enlarger you are using (or, might plan to buy in the future). If you re-check the specs on the different units with that in mind, I think it will become more clear.
    [COLOR=SlateGray]"You can't depend on your eyes if your imagination is out of focus." -Mark Twain[/COLOR]

    Ralph Barker
    Rio Rancho, NM

  5. #5
    Saganich's Avatar
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    I bought an stop clock pro which can integrate the zonemaster. I would start with a stop clock pro then see if if you want to add the zone master later especially if you do volume work. If not then learn to use your eyes first then upgrade to the zonemaster. It is a fancy bit of equipment. Download the manual and read it. Beware that the Rh timers have their own plugs so you will have to strip one end of an extension cord, not as difficult as it sounds. I love mine it forced me to print mindfully and with goals which was an improvement.

    chris
    Chris Saganich
    http://www.imagebrooklyn.com

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by JeffD
    I was thinking about the analyzer pro, and whether it would be something helpful to me.

    I don't use the standard 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 paper grade filters that the device is probably designed for.
    ....
    Unless I'm completely mistaken (and it's been known to happen), the Analyser Pro can be calibrated to whatever paper you're using. It's not "designed for" any particular paper, although it comes from the factory calibrated to Ilford Multigrade RC. The version I'm using is a slightly different model, the Analyser Pro 500, and is designed expressly for use with the Ilford 500 Multigrade head. (In fact, it cannot be used with any other head.) One of its virtues is that can be calibrated for papers which aren't "standard" (whatever "standard" means). Additionally, it will store calibration settings for several different papers which can be recalled later when changing papers. In the interest of full disclosure, I've not ever used the non-500 version of the Analyser Pro. But it's my understanding that the operation is very similar.

    With regard to the original question of whether to purchase the Analyser Pro or the Stopclock with the ZoneMaster, I would thoroughly read the details of each at the RH Designs web site. Also take a look at Paul Butzi's reviews at http://www.butzi.net/. When you get your technical questions narrowed down, Chris Woodhouse, who designed these marvelous devides, can be reached through the ktphotonics web site.
    My Verito page

    Anyone can appreciate a fine print. But it takes a real photographer to appreciate a fine negative.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by JeffD
    I was thinking about the analyzer pro, and whether it would be something helpful to me.

    I don't use the standard 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 paper grade filters that the device is probably designed for.

    Instead, I use a dichro head with a continuous range between full yellow and no magenta to all magenta and no yellow light to vary my contrasts. Problem is, I have no idea exactly which of those combinations of yellow and magenta fall on those generally accepted grade numbers.
    There is one scientific defined measurement of paper grade, the ISO-R number. You are free to assign any ISO-R number to any paper grade (and a lot of manufacturers did this, too), but a lot of people use Ilford numbers. These run: 180 - 160 - 130 - 110 - 90 - 70 - 50 for the paper grades 00 .. 5

    The Analyser (and the Zonemaster) can calibrated to any number assignment you wish. If your dicro head has any repeatable (!) method to get a setting, you can use it with an Analyser or Zonemaster.

    At first you need a step wedge (eg. T2115 from Stouffer) to make a table of dicro head settings and resulting ISO-R values of your paper. Paul Butzi wrote an excellent article how this is done, you can find it here. It will take about 1-2h of work to get this list of settings and resulting ISO-R values for one type of paper.

    After you got this table, you can calibrate the Analyzer. With the step wedge, this is accomplished in another hour. After that, your workflow is like that:

    • put negative in enlarger, use white light
    • measure up to 8 points in the enlarged image, the Analyzer shows the grey value of each measurement
    • widen or narrow your grey scale (switching gradations) or move it to the darker or lighter side (with longer or shorter exposure)
    • set the dicro head to the shown gradation following your compiled list
    • put paper under the head, make the exposure


    This will give you excellent results for 90% of your negs in the first try. I work with the Analyser and (recently) the Stopclock/Zonemaster since 1997 and can't imagine been without it...

    Martin

  8. #8
    Jeremy's Avatar
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    If you get the analyser, find the manufacturer's ISO R and P ratings for their paper and start off with those. I just recently finished a 2.5 hour calibration and my numbers were with a few of the manufacturer's numbers--this is time I could have been printing real pictures!
    Let's see what I've got in the magic trash can for Mateo!

    blog
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  9. #9

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    Isn't the Analyser Pro just the Stopclock and the Zonemaster combined into one unit?

    Thor Egil

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by tleirtro
    Isn't the Analyser Pro just the Stopclock and the Zonemaster combined into one unit?

    Thor Egil
    The feature set of the Analyser is a subset of the Stopclock/Zonemaster combo. The Stopclock features things like drydown automatic, two time channels with 9 steps each and 1/24 stop step size. You can do everything with a Stopclock/Zonemaster the Analyzer is capable and do a few things more.

    Martin (who switched from Analyser to Stopclock/Zonemaster)

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