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  1. #1
    marciofs's Avatar
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    What kind of filters are these?

    Click image for larger version. 

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    It came with the enlarger when I bought it.

  2. #2
    eddie's Avatar
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    Looks like a red filter, to keep the paper from exposure, while the enlarger is on.

  3. #3
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    A red filter is included with many enlargers. It's meant for you to project a safe image on the paper for last-minute composition and focus checking before you make the white light exposure.

    Funny thing is, I don't remember the last time I ever used mine - even though I go to some trouble to keep it handy and clean.

    It would be useful if you use lightweight easels that move when you put the paper in, but my usual easel is solid and doesn't budge when nudged.

  4. #4
    Jim Jones's Avatar
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    In some enlargers, the negative pops after the lamp heats up. One way to avoid this is to leave the light on and use the red filter as a shutter. To prevent enlarger movement while swinging the filter under or away from the lens, hold the other hand under the lens while moving the filter, and control the exposure with that hand.

  5. #5
    marciofs's Avatar
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    Thanks,

    But why two filter? One is dark read (the square one) and the other lighter red.

  6. #6

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    For different kinds/brands of paper.

  7. #7
    marciofs's Avatar
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    Ok.
    Thank you very much again.

  8. #8
    andrew.roos's Avatar
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    I find the red filter useful for positioning test strips - I like to have them covering areas of shadow, highlights and the subject.

    Andrew
    Bronica ETRSi, Nikon F3 and FM.

  9. #9

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    I always wondered about the grain focusing part, you do that BEFORE the paper is added, FB is thick, this would seemingly "throw off" the "perfect" grain focus, and the red filter would alleviate this by allowing you to focus once the paper is laid down.

    Am I the only one who ever wondered if the focus would be off since the paper wasn't down when you're using the grain focuser?

  10. #10
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    I always wondered about the grain focusing part, you do that BEFORE the paper is added, FB is thick, this would seemingly "throw off" the "perfect" grain focus, and the red filter would alleviate this by allowing you to focus once the paper is laid down.

    Am I the only one who ever wondered if the focus would be off since the paper wasn't down when you're using the grain focuser?
    There are long, sometimes acrimonious threads on just this subject.

    In essence, the thickness of the paper is well within the depth of focus of the process. If you do the applicable math, you will see that clearly.

    The critical distance is the distance between the negative and the principal node of the enlarging lens.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

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