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  1. #1

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    Suspicions about Paterson 5-reel tank

    Hmmm... I am wondering if anyone else has experienced this. I have always used Paterson 3-reel tanks. I am careful and consistent with every facet of my development regimen. As a result, for a couple of decades, I have always had consistent results. Finally, I just needed to get more film proceesed faster so I switched to a Paterson 5-reel tank. I have just finished my fourth 5-reel session and I am slowly starting to suspect that not all of the reels are seeing the same amount of development. I develop for 9.5 minutes in D-76 at 1:1 with three quick inversions every 30 seconds. Is this possible or am I just imagining things?

    Thanks, JK

  2. #2
    johnnywalker's Avatar
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    I have the 5-reel tank, and use ID-11 (same D-76) 1+1 or 1+3. I do 4 slow inversions once a minute. No sign of uneven development so far, touch wood. I wait for the "glugging" to stop before doing the second half of the inversion. That doesn't happen quickly, so possibly your inversions are too rapid to completely mix the developer. Just a thought.
    If I had been present at the creation, I would have given some useful hints for the better arrangement of the Universe.
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  3. #3
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Well I've been using the old system 4 Paterson 5 reel tanks for well over 25 years with no problems, using various developers including Rodinal & Xtol more recently. Secret is to get the developer poured in quickly, and use the locking ring as well particulary if less than 5 reels.

    Have 2 of these 5 reel tanks, and numerous smaller sizes, also the largest which holds 7 or 8 35mm reels - I think it to risky putting all my films in this one and have never used it.

    A good tip is to clean the reels by a prolonged soaking in Biological washing powder every so often, they load easier afterwards.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by johnnywalker
    I have the 5-reel tank, and use ID-11 (same D-76) 1+1 or 1+3. I do 4 slow inversions once a minute. No sign of uneven development so far, touch wood. I wait for the "glugging" to stop before doing the second half of the inversion. That doesn't happen quickly, so possibly your inversions are too rapid to completely mix the developer. Just a thought.
    Thank you for the idea. I went back to the 3-reel unit last night and noticed that my inversions are just the tiniest bit quicker than the "glugging" time. I am guessing that the glug time for the 5-reel unit is considerably longer, so I may have been shortchanging the intra-tank homogenization process considerably. When using the 5-reel setup, I will modify my inversions to allow for complete glugging cycles.

    By the way, I did not mean to impugn the Paterson tanks in my original post. I have used them forever with excellent results. I am totally satisfied with them.
    Thanks, JK

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Everyone
    "glugging"
    Is this the scientific term?

    Actually I use the same term to describe it, too.
    Let's see what I've got in the magic trash can for Mateo!

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  6. #6
    johnnywalker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeremy Moore
    Is this the scientific term?
    From the Latin "gluger" (verb) to rapidly drink Roman beer so that the throat makes the sound of intermittant falling liquid. As an aside, the verb is irregular in the super pluperfect subjunctive.
    If I had been present at the creation, I would have given some useful hints for the better arrangement of the Universe.
    Alfonso the Wise, 1221-1284

  7. #7

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    I've never had trouble with these tanks. I would agree, though, that it is important to get the dev in and out quickly (and to get the right amount, just in case you were on 3 reel autopilot). You also need to bang them on the table (another technical term ) a bit more to get all the air bubbles to surface.

    David.

  8. #8
    George Papantoniou's Avatar
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    We used to use a tank just like that in my school, back in the eighties. It took ages to fill it up and it weighed a ton, so by banging it on the table we finished by destroying it (the table, not the tank :-). Everyone wanted to use it, for it saved us time by allowing us to develop 5 films at a time, and noone cared about even results back then.
    I'd never use a tank that takes more than 10secs to fill and drain now that I've become a neurotic perfectionist, though. I'll stick to my 2 reel Jobo tank and be more patient than I was in my youth. I would advise you to do the same, for if you aren't a neurotic perfectionist you'll become one later in your life ;-)

  9. #9

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    I'll second the slow inversions to allow full mixing. I also tap the base hard on a hard surface as it seems more prone to trapped air bells than smaller tanks. Nice slow inversions that allow the gluggs to subside and a few hard bangs on the bench and all is well. compared to the UK Jessops tanks, the paterson is much leakier too f I am generous with solution.

    Tom

  10. #10
    Dave Miller's Avatar
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    As an aside, I find that the trick with the Paterson tanks is to press the centre of the soft top cap whilst lifting the edge a little to let the air escape. This leaves a slight negative pressure within the tank, which reduces leakage to a minimum. I quite agree about the Glug time govening the inversion rate, it's very important to give the liquid time to settle. In the 8 reel tank this is about 30 seconds.
    Regards Dave.

    An English Eye


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